Indian Summer

Indian Summer

I It’s a hazy shade of late summer— a color, vibrant yet subtle, smooth and alluring, as elegant as a cloud and closing the SoCal summer in style. The cultural relationship to pastels is most often connected with spring because of their association with Easter— pastels have created strong connections with other cultural movements throughout history, too. Pastels were initially known as a chalk-like medium for artists during the Renaissance. In the 17th and 18th centuries, pastel painting became a popular medium with the rise of the Baroque and Rococo styles. During this time, pastels became fashionable in dress because the same frivolity that was the popular taste in art was applied to clothing as well. Marie Antoinette had a proclivity for grand gowns done in pastel silks and laces. In the 20th century, pastels regained popularity during the Roaring Twenties, as flappers turned to the light tones as a response to the seriousness of World War I. Later on, pastels became the calling card of Miami architecture, as art-deco buildings throughout South Beach got a fresh coat of candy-colored paint, reviving the city. Pastels also made an impact on pop culture, with the iconic style of Sonny Crockett on Miami Vice and the art direction of Wes Anderson films, including The Grand Budapest Hotel. That was of course replaced by the chic and eternal, black. But as we all know, fashion comes and goes, so here we are at the backend of Summer looking at the neo-pastels for a summer style extravaganza. Photographed by up-and-coming photographer Christian Acosta, styled by Melissa Tejada, modeled by Danielle Fedder and make-up and hair by Caprice Mitchell. Photographed at the legendary Country Club Studio.

SHOP THE LOOK

RIAN

RIAN

Mini Choker Bag – Clear PVC (Vegan)

Choker Collar (2.5") – Clear PVC

Choker Collar (1.25") – Tan

Choker Cuff (2.5") – Clear PVC

Rita Corset Belt

THE CREW

Christian Acosta – Photographer – @Chrisdnlacosta
Danielle Fedder – Model [email protected]
Melissa Tejada – Stylist [email protected]_
Caprice Mitchell – MUA @primakeupartistry

Imagine Fest Brings Music & Yoga to Agoura Hills While Creating Social Impact

Imagine Fest Brings Music & Yoga to Agoura Hills While Creating Social Impact

Founder Natalie Backman & The Young Leaders Council created a fundraising festival that united the Yogi community in helping carry out Unlikely Heroes mission to end human trafficking.

Imagine Fest was a Yoga + Music + Conscious Conversation fundraising festival created by Natalie Backman and The Young Leaders Council to benefit the non-profit, Unlikely Heroes. Taking place on Sunday, September 22, 2019 from 12:00 PM – 10:00PM, guests opted to enjoy a Sunday Funday full of live music, yoga, meditation and powerful panel sessions aimed at creating social change. 100% of the proceeds acquired at Imagine Fest were used to help fund Unlikely Heroes’ efforts in saving & restoring the lives of child victims of sex trafficking around the world. Performers like Maya Jupiter, Satsang, Tubby Love & Amber Lily; and Player Won provided music sets that fused entertainment with conscious healing and awareness. Acro yoga workshops were lead by renowned yogis, Modern Tarzan & Sprout. A wide array of artisanal vendors and food trucks were on site providing guests with a multitude of options to eat delicious, health conscious food and shop from local businesses. Panels were held by a number of thought leaders, including the founder of Unlikely Heroes, Erica Greve.

The most notable thing about the event isn’t who was in attendance, or what they did, however. In fact the objective of the event was to raise funds for Unlikely Heroes to provide healthcare, shelter, education, recreational activities, rehabilitation resources, love, and hope to rescued victims of sex trafficking domestic and abroad. Many of the world’s most frightening and unimaginable issues are often closer to us than we know. Unlikely Heroes is here to combat these real-life nightmares.

The list of notable guests in attendance included Satsang; Maya Jupiter; Dustin Thomas; Tubby Love & Amber Lily, Aloe Blacc, Inetra Brazil, Anisha Gibbs, Modern Tarzan, Sprout, Robot Nature, and Player WON; Founder of Imagine Fest, Natalie Backman; and Non-Profit, Founder of Unlikely Heroes, Erica Greves. In addition, the event was sponsored by The Goldhill Group, California Commercial Investment, The Ave, Brian Fung, Quadranet, Andrea Gootnick, Pranamaya.

About Unlikely Heroes:

Unlikely Heroes, is a local non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing and rehabilitating child victims of sex trafficking in countries such as Nigeria, Thailand, Mexico and the Philippines as well as the United States. The organization strives to rescue and rehabilitate the lives of these children as well as post trauma therapy, education, medical care and job training and most importantly, a happy, healthy childhood.

About Natalie Backman:

Natalie Backman is a yoga teacher, and the Founder of Imagine Fest. Originally from Washington State, Natalie has called Los Angeles home for nearly seven years and has been teaching yoga for five of them. She is currently a 500-hour Experienced Registered Yoga Teacher of the Himalayan Tradition and is working toward certification in ParaYoga with Rod Stryker. She teaches weekly at Agoura Power of Yoga as well as Horizons Senior Center, MUSE School, and for several private clients. She, along with the entire Imagine Fest family, donates her time and energy to offer healing and empowerment to their local community, as well as an opportunity to be the change we wish to see.

Isle of Man

Isle of Man

We here at SoCal, love our home—we love the endless summers, the traffic congestion, the ubiquitous out-door-dining and of course the ability to get to the desert, the sea, the vineyards and Mexico quickly, if the electric car would only go that far…so we take to flight, travel, spend time in other cultures and countries. This time, we have sent our best writer, Niki Smart, to visit that small land between England and Ireland, the Isle of Man, for a summer travel report:

As kids, my sister and I spent a year living with our father in the Isle of Man, and to be frank, we both loathed it. We complained endlessly, or at least I did, and gave it unflattering names like the Isle of Bile, the Isle of Vile, the Isle of Just Shoot Me Please…and so on. You’d think then, that some 40 years later when my sister suggested we go back and reevaluate the Isle of Man, that I’d be reluctant, but I was curious and agreed. Maybe it was time to reassess the place.

Fist off, a 3-hour ferry ride from Liverpool to the Isle of Man’s capital, Douglas—and a quick side note; 40 years later, Liverpool has an amazing waterfront area laden with restaurants, cafés, history, art, culture and much visit-worthy coolness.

As a child, the ferry ride had always seemed pretty rough, but I thought maybe that was because I was a little. Surely it couldn’t be that bad? Oh. So. Wrong! The voyage was as grueling as I remembered, meaning, I came very close to losing my lunch. Arriving in pouring rain, three motion-sickly hours later, my sister and I struggled to figure out how to get to our seafront hotel because the entire promenade was seemingly being dug up, traffic was being rerouted without any clear signage, and parking was a messy bitch. To top it off, since it was a rainy, Monday night, not many restaurants were open, and as we trudged about in the grim cold searching for a place to eat, I thought, “Well, we just made a big bloody mistake.”

The Little Fish Café helped cheer us up with the British classic of fish and chips, plus a window seat looking onto the quayside of colorful sailboats. Strangely enough, there was also a brightly painted wallaby in our view. Intrigued, I looked up the significance because—hello—a wallaby in the Isle of Man? I discovered that in roughly 1985 several wallabies escaped Curraghs Wildlife Park (the Isle of Man’s only zoo,) and had since started breeding in the wild. Apparently, there are now nearly one hundred wallabies roaming the Isle of Man and I instantly felt a kinship to them. They’d been sent to the island against their will (just like us as kids), and I was certain those poor creatures longed for their Australian home the way I’d longed for mine during my year of no escape.

On day two, the sun came out, and after a warming, cheerful breakfast at Noa Bake House (a bicycle café in an old market warehouse), my sister and I drove to the opposite side of the island— a whole 10 miles away—to visit Peel. For part of this drive we were actually on the racecourse that the motorbikes use during the infamous TT races, complete with padded corners at the sharper turns.

Peel is a quaint seaside/fishing village nestled under the eye of the ruins of Peel Castle. Built in the 11th century by the Vikings, Peel Castle has a long history, and is rumored to be haunted by a ghostly black dog. We walked the circumference of the castle grounds along rugged coastline and landed up on the tiny, but charming, Fenella beach. My brave sister bought a “kipper bap” (a bun with a fried kipper wedged in it) from a food truck parked right by the beach/castle—salty, but delicious. Look at this menu! It’s not one you see everyday.

Driving 3 miles south of Peel, we stumbled upon Glen Maye, a fairytale place of fern-filled woodlands, 20 foot hanging ivy, a bridged gorge and waterfalls. It blew my mind a little bit because it was so ridiculously gorgeous. Why aren’t they filming movies here, I wondered? It would make a magical backdrop for Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings or GOT. I was what the British would call “gobsmacked” by nature. After some staring about in disbelief, a friendly passerby suggested our next stop: the Niarbyl Bay Café.

The Niarbyl Café is down a little country road that leads only to the café plus a few historical cottages. The view was impressive, the tea and scones were perfect, and the walk down to the historical cottages was well worth it. I can’t quite explain what was so incredible about this café, but it made me high on life just to be there. Heading back to Douglas, our chosen restaurant for the night was the Tandoor South Indian Restaurant, where both the service and food were first-rate. My perspective of the Isle of Man was improving.

Day three, the wind hit 45 mph and I started worrying a) about our rough ride back to Liverpool and b) that we might be stuck on the island as the ferry was cancelled for the day. Our day of hiking, however, was not cancelled because my sister insisted on going to see Cashtal yn ard—and yes, I spelled that correctly. The well-preserved Cashtal yn ard is one of three Neolithic tombs, dating from about 2000 BC, and I have to say, it’s pretty stirring to stand before such history. We drove along ever-narrowing lanes, splashed through a ford, and hiked in sideways-rain to see the place, and still it was worth it.

This was followed by a quick stop at the iconic Great Laxey Wheel; the largest working waterwheel in the world. We’d planned to visit the wheel by hopping on the vintage electric tram but the heavy rain made the ride sound less appealing. Having had enough weather for one day, we sought refuge in the Manx Museum where the Island’s 10,000-year history is presented through film, galleries and interactive displays. It’s free and quite delightful.

On our last day, the weather turned kinder, helping us have another “off the charts” day exploring. We visited Castle Town’s medieval, 25-foot high Castle Rushen—a stronghold that served as a home to kings in the late 12th century and later as a prison during the 18th century. If you’ve ever wanted a truly medieval experience, this may be the place to go visit. We skipped from castle life to rural life at Cregneash—a folk village that depicts the typical way of life that a small Manx village in the 19th century would have had. Here we got to see a Manx cat (a cat with no tail) as well as several brown haired, four-horned Manx Loaghtan sheep. Other than the biting wind, I imagine the folks living in the village must have been a happy bunch as Cregneash lies on a rolling hillside with stunning panoramas to all sides.

From Cregneash we drove to the very southwest tip of the island to see the Calf of Man— a tiny island that is a Nature Reserve and Bird Observatory. This was our last and favorite stop because the views were simply spectacular.

Our final meal was at Barbary Coast Grill and Bar, a fun place with tasty burgers that let’s you “spin the wheel” —and if your table number hits, your food is free (not your drinks though, but a very generous offer none-the-less).

Dreading our ferry trip home, we bought “Travel Calm”, and thankfully at least our stomachs traveled calmly over yet another seriously rough Irish Sea voyage. To sum up our trip, other than the jarring ferry ride, the Isle of Man was outstanding. I wish I could go back in time and show my young-self all the magical amazingness the island has to offer. And please allow me finish by saying I believe the wallabies have found themselves a rather wonderful place to call home.

Second Home comes to Hollywood

Second Home comes to Hollywood

The area of East Hollywood where the current Target is being built, very slowly, has a new neighbor. At night, driving by St. Andrews Place, one imagines a new mid-century modern hotel has moved in, what with the amber lighting and modern hanging lamps, its look like something that might be found in Palm Springs, not between Western Avenue and St. Andrews Place. It is so new that Google maps has not registered it. It opened last Monday, and it’s called Second Home. No, it is not for senior citizens, thought they are certainly welcome. Second Home is the newest “workspace” to slip into the vast SoCal terrain. Like Soho House, Neuehouse, Second Home caters to a sophisticated clientele in search of space, light, and working conditions that bring creative types together. Created by London-based co-founders and co-CEOs Sam Aldenton and Rohan Silva, Second Home is the new campus was designed by Madrid-based architecture firm Selgascano, with Downtown LA-based Omgivning acting as executive architect for the project. A lush landscape of light, 60 circular acrylic pods and foliage, it is simply, surprising that this somewhat off-beat neighborhood should house anything so glamourous. Second home hollywood will be home to 250 organizations and will feature: a branch of second home’s bookshop libreria, a 200-person auditorium, post-production facilities, a restaurant, outdoor terraces, and meeting and event spaces.

For memberships, a tour, information visit https://secondhome.io/hollywood

Address: 1370 N St Andrew’s Place, Los Angeles, CA 90028

 

AND ON THURSDAY, SPETEMBER 19TH

Antoni is the food and wine guru on Netflix’s Emmy Award-winning sensation Queer Eye, and his passion for food is completely irresistible. A television personality, chef, model, and now cookbook author, Antoni is a man of many talents and even more fascinating stories.

During this evening event, guests will get to meet Antoni and taste recipes from his new cookbook, Antoni in the Kitchen (published by HMH Books, on sale September 9).

Antoni in the Kitchen brings together Antoni’s trademark inclusive and accessible attitude to food with one hundred of his all-time favorite recipes.

This cookbook celebrates Antoni’s love for fresh, casual, and healthy cooking, and the occasional indulgent feast, and inspires both newbies and knowledgeable cooks to get back into the kitchen.

The ticket price includes a copy of the cookbook Antoni in the Kitchen and food inspired by his recipes.

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