PAIR Eyewear Lights Up Inspiring Kids Eyewear

PAIR Eyewear Lights Up Inspiring Kids Eyewear

Do you ever wish you could turn back the clock and experience the modern world as a kid? Unfortunately, we don’t have anything to help make that come true. However, we’re happy to introduce PAIR Eyewear – the customizable, high quality, affordable and fun glasses your kids deserve! Now, we know you can relate when it comes to looking back at the limitations that existed for children’s glasses back in the day.

Founded by two life-long glasses wearers, and catching notoriety on Shark Tank (spoiler alert: they got a deal!), PAIR addresses the top two issues facing youngsters in need of their first set: affordability and confidence. With a mix and match approach, the prescription base frames start at just $60, and interchangeable toppers (including sunglass selections) start at $25 each. With PAIR, not only are kids part of designing something just for them, they can feel good about sporting their new spectacular spectacles! Change for the season, an upcoming event or vacation, or just for fun – PAIR delivers unmatched versatility for children up to 14 years old, while also being a wallet-friendly solution for parents. Just in time for summer, PAIR just launched  a new star-spangled Fourth of July collection – Red, White and You — as well as a glitter-clad Sparkle Collection!

Because PAIR believes that every child deserves attention to eyehealth – for every PAIR purchased one will be donated to children in the developing world, through their partnership with The Eyelliance.

Words From Sophia Edelstein, Co-CEO and Co-Founder of PAIR Eyewear

Why kids? 

“Before PAIR, no one had ever sat down and asked kids what they wanted in a pair of glasses. After interviewing over 500 families, we kept hearing from kids that their glasses didn’t feel like an extension of their personality. Nathan, one of our co-founders had the exact same experience as a child wearing glasses and hated the lack of choices available and the inability to change them as your favorite color or style changed.

 

We started PAIR to solve this problem and create the first glasses company designed from the ground up, for children and parents. PAIR gives kids the ability of choice and unlocks self-expression, which makes them want to wear their glasses more!”

 

Starting The Business 

“We started PAIR from our college dorm rooms. We spent our senior year interviewing as many families as possible, to find all of the pain points associated with the glasses buying experience for children. Together, with the former head of product from Warby Parker, we designed the perfect PAIR of glasses for kids that’s customizable but also affordable for parents! We created a buying process that’s so easy and simple that a mom can buy glasses for her kids while relaxing on the couch watching tv.”

A STEP BEYOND: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful

A STEP BEYOND: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful

The Los Angeles art world, like the broader society, is struggling with how to continue to operate during the Covid-19 Pandemic. Art galleries and museums all over the Southland have shuttered their doors and installations have languished in darkened rooms, without visitors. Interesting solutions have emerged to tackle this difficult challenge. One solution is to create fully digital visiting tools, which enables show-goers to visit an art space from the comfort and safety of their home.
A fabulous 2020 design show entitled “A STEP BEYOND: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful” has recently graced the galleries at the venerable Otis College of Art and Design. While the gallery doors for A STEP BEYOND were prematurely closed to the public in mid-March, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, show curator Lauria and gallery staff pivoted quickly and were able to digitize the show experience. The OTIS team has created an online tour of the show including a virtual curator tour, which is coming soon.
Otis is a private college, founded in 1918, which was the first independent professional school of art established in Los Angeles. The Ben Maltz Gallery on campus features a full slate of art and design shows throughout the calendar year. Guest curator, Jo Lauria has created a knock-out show for the space. On the Ben Maltz gallery site, there is now a 60-image slide show complete with didactic information. While nothing can replace the visceral experience of seeing a beautifully designed art show in person, during the time of social distancing this is certainly a healthy and welcome option. The full show can be accessed at:  https://www.otis.edu/ben-maltz-gallery/step-beyond-contemporary-footwear-functional-to-fanciful

“At the beginning of the War we were limited to the prescribed boot for walking…now our choice of shoes has become more unlimited than ever, and the subject of footwear fascinating enough to talk about at length.”– Vogue Magazine, 1918

Humans have an intimate relationship with shoes. In the time of pre-history, our ancestors utilized woven grasses and animal hide to wrap the foot for needed warmth and protection. Fast forward to our modern age, and footwear – even our perception of it – has changed radically. We now universally obsess over the design, concept and look of the shoes we wear and collect. For some, shoes are the ultimate status symbol.

 

 

A STEP BEYOND show, Otis Alumni shoes, L-R: Anna Miller (above), Alexandria Felix and Jacob Kim (below)

Historical shoes on display representing decades from 1900 through 2010, “A Step Beyond”

Rem D. Koolhas, “Mobius” shoe progression for United Nude, 2003-2016. UNITED NUDE, a global lifestyle brand co-founded by Rem D. Koolhaas, combines fashion, architecture, and design to produce footwear with an “alternative attitude.”

Situated at the intersection of art and design, A STEP BEYOND explores the complex relationship between fashion, footwear, society and culture – focusing on the past 110 years. The exhibition features contemporary footwear from a variety of perspectives, including custom shoes designed and handcrafted for a private client; luxury, limited-edition creations made for a privileged clientele; and shoes mass-produced for the consumer market.

“Footwear reflects the imagination, innovation, and artistry of its time.”– Jo Lauria, curator

A STEP BEYOND also includes footwear related artworks and showcases the imagination and technical prowess invested in human foot covering. The show features five shoe collections, (including twenty-one collectible sneakers), and eighty-five historical shoes, dating from 1900 through 2010. Twenty-three international artists, craftsmen and architects are represented including luminaries such as Andy Warhol, Rem D. Koolhaas and Zaha Hadid.

Zaha Hadid “NOVA” shoe for United Nude

Paul Kaufman for pskaufman shoes. Kaufman, has worked for international companies Dr. Martens, Na Na, Fornarina, Rocket Dog, Twin Star, and London Underground.

 The enduring allure of the Cowboy boot, A Step Beyond

The show is smartly divided into seven distinctive categories, outlined by the curator as follows:

The shoe as functional footwear – encompassing custom designed and handcrafted shoes for private clients, luxury, limited-edition creations for privileged clientele, and mass-produced shoes for the consumer market

The shoe as structure, sculpture and performance gear: highlighting artists/designers who successfully merge functionality with freedom of expression and the extend the shoe into other artistic realms.

The shoe as fashion marker: charting fashion trends and key developments in 20th and 21st century design.

The shoe as composition: focusing on the illustrated shoe as fashion’s most important accessory.

The shoe beyond literal object: Featuring the shoe as protagonist in individual artistic narratives.

The shoe as collectible: centering on the phenomenon of shoe collectors and their collections.

The shoe as design challenge: Otis alumni and faculty rise to the challenge of creating footwear with flair.

By separating the exhibit into these distinct categories, the viewer is encouraged to think about the shoe not only in its historical context, but to see it as a practical object and an art/luxury object. The various ways artists and designers think about, and approach the shoe, is the focus.

Ill-fitting or supportive, teetering or flat, silent or squeaky, restrictive or ergonomic, the forms surrounding our feet ask us to weigh nature against desire, and the outcome of this equation, when tipped even slightly toward one side or another, has the ability to impact every inch of our bodies and our understanding of ourselves.” – Amara Hark-Weber, bespoke shoemaker

Highlighting the artists who have participated in the exhibit, it was indeed tempting to try to cover every maker in the show, as they all have fascinating stories and create beautiful work. I’ve chosen a handful of contributors to highlight whom I feel capture the spirit of the exhibit.

 

The shoe as collectible, A STEP BEYOND, featuring a selection from the sneaker collection of Twin Daniel, and high-fashion shoes from the collections of Jean Concoff and Pamela Weir-Quiton.

Elisabeth Thorsen wearing her handcrafted leather Rose Maling shoes embellished with fresh water pearls, antique beads and gold thread, with hand-carved wood soles and heels, 2013; and on dinner plate is her handmade shoe Tsar Saltan, embossed leather, hand-carved wood soles and heels, 2013.

Elisabeth Thorsen, L-R: Easy Ticket to Hoppa-Hage, 2017, marbleized vegetable leather-chalk heels; Polka, 2018, Goodyear welted shoes, vegetable leather , hand-painted and hand-stitched details, in collaboration with Mari Jaeger, designer and Paint Me a Birdie (shoes), 2015, embroidery and EVA materials, in collaboration with Jens Stegger Ledaal; and Print from Print Me a Birdie shoes, 2015, ink on paper.

Elisabeth Thorsen is a Norwegian shoemaker and performance artist who draws inspiration from “nature, art, fairytales and 1970’s movies.”  Thorsen graduated from the Norwegian school for shoemaking in 2008 and has been making art using shoes as her primary focus ever since. Thorsen views her work as pieces of art, not merely functional objects. Her performances are both live and captured in digital video. She prefers to craft her shoes with experimental, non-traditional materials such as “carpets, furniture, carved sculptural elements, drapes and even ice, sugar, pencils and sports tape.” (1: From Artist Bio, Elisabeth Thorsen)

In Gaza Bowen’s series, Shoes for the Little Woman, the shoes are fabricated mostly from cleaning products that serve as a parody for the stereotype of the happy housewife who “enjoys” housework.  Gaza first learned her craft in 1976 at Colonial Williamsburg from a master cobbler. Gaza dedicated nearly twenty years to honing her construction skills and representing the shoe’s “cultural meaning and social significance” in both functional footwear and sculptural applications. 

“The works on display provide a focused look into the extraordinary life of Gaza Bowen. If anyone can claim the territory of “progenitor of sculptural shoes,” it is Gaza: she originated the concept of ‘narrative’ footwear that combines humor, unusual materials, invention, attitude, and social commentary.” – Jo Lauria, curator

Gaza, who passed away in 2005, noted “there’s more (to the shoes) for the person that cares to look. In that humor, I’m trying to make a statement about women and fashion, and women and household cleaning, and women as sex symbols.”

 

Helen Chung is an LA artist who works in multiple medium including installation, painting and photography. Drawing on popular culture, literature, and her former experience in accessory design, the artist attempts to “debunk social and cultural myths surrounding the notions of possession, desire, objectification, commodity, and commerce.”   “The two bodies of work on exhibit,” adds the artist, “are displayed in a boutique style with shoes and bags, except the items displayed are only containers of such objects. The boxes and the deconstructed shopping bags engage in a dialogue between intuition and intention, outlining two different processes: one planned with specific outcome, the other, a spontaneous process allowing whim and chance. The work ironically challenges the fixed notion of containers, as merely an external protection or subordinate transporting aid, not quite qualifying as an entity in itself.”  By focusing on the container, and the concept of containment, curator Jo Lauria notes “Helen maintains the integrity of the shoebox and the shopping bag by not adding anything or taking anything away.”

Bespoke shoemaker, Amara Hark-Weber considers the shoe “an extension of body, vehicle, representation of personal identity, inhibitor to/enhancer of movement, metaphor, fetish form, or simply utilitarian object.” Through sculptural footwear, Hark-Weber seeks to question our ideas of function and what we are willing to subject our bodies to. 

‘My sculptural footwear is an exploration of human movement, building techniques, and visual metaphor. They are objects that come alive with personal narrative when worn, with the power to challenge the viewer’s ideas about form, function, body, and movement.”– Amara Hark-Weber

 

Elisabeth Thorsen, Shizaru (4th Monkey Boot), 2018, leather, hand-carved wood heels. Carving by Trude Johansen, detail.

Gaza Bowen, “Little Woman AM” shoes, 1995, leather, rubber foam, linoleum, plastic bottles, dish scrubbers.

Gaza Bowen, Shoes for the Angry Little Woman, 1990, knives, potato peelers, rhinestones, skewers, scouring pads, kidskin, wood, paint, embroidered cloth, rose twigs, nail polish.

 

Helen Chung, Shoe Boxes and Shopping Bags

Amara Hark-Weber, shoe designer-maker in her studio.

Amara Hark-Weber, L-R: Muscle Memory: Equilibrium, 2013, cork, kidskin, thread; Muscle Memory: Opposition, 2013, kidskin, thread, hardware; Muscle Memory: Regrounding, 2013, basswood, kidskin.

“Andy Warhol glorified the shoe by using it as the sole seductive element of his still-life drawings, devoting entire portfolios to illustrations of women’s footwear.” – Jo Lauria, curator

The show also features artists who use images of shoes in their work. Spirited pen and ink drawings of shoes by Andy Warhol are included. According to the exhibition didactic, Andy Warhol began his career as a commercial artist in New York City in the 1940s and self-published hand-colored prints of his campy and glamorous shoes. 

“Widely distributed in fashion magazines such as Glamour and Vogue, Warhol’s illustrations elevated the pump to an object of desire.”  – Jo Lauria, curator 

Joshua Wong’s artwork of glamorous shoes, reflects his life-long love of footwear as luxury item. Inspired by the Upper East Side ladies of Manhattan hailing cabs in their 4-inch heels, Wong launched a successful career designing women’s footwear and handbags. Wong’s love for fashion illustration began in childhood when he was four years old, when his parents noticed that he was drawing high-heeled shoes and racing cars. He later mastered these skills at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. 

After a career in advertising Ralph Lauren hired Joshua to be his women’s collection footwear designer. There, he was involved in “the fast-paced world of runway shows and super models.” While traveling to Paris, Milan and London, Joshua was inspired to capture even more stories of fashion and design. Later on, he became the vice president of footwear design at Banana Republic.  Joshua currently enjoys developing the next generation of designers as a mentor at various schools and is an official mentor at his alma mater, Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. (2: From Artist Bio, Joshua Wong)

Amara Hark-Weber – Measurements, a work in progress

Andy Warhol, reproductions of original ink and pen drawings of shoes. Courtesy of Sotheby’s photography.

Joshua Wong, “Snake Shoe” ink and pen drawing on paper

Gregory Weir-Quiton is a legendary fashion illustrator who can usually be seen at Los Angeles art events, sitting in the middle of the crowd, drawing from life. 

“My passion is drawing the contemporary figure. Fashion design obviously influences my work since what intrigues me is how people design themselves (and everyone does). The drawing is an end in itself and I rarely add anything once the pose is over.” – Gregory Weir-Quiton

As a young person Weir-Quiton saw a fashion illustration in the local Detroit newspaper, and he knew he had found his calling. He graduated from Cass Tech High School, majoring in fashion illustration and then received a scholarship to Art Students League. He worked in New York and Chicago before moving to Los Angeles. In Los Angeles, he met and married his wife Pamela Weir-Quiton a celebrated wood worker. Her fantastic collection of shoe wear is featured in the exhibit. For 35 years, Gregory worked with major California retailers in the fashion industry including, THE MAY COMPANY, ROBINSONS, BULLOCKS, THE BROADWAY and I. MAGNIN. In this role, Gregory honed his skills of drawing shoes for advertisements. He would later refine these skills to create his more personal fashion illustrations of the human figure, accessorized.  After a long career in fashion illustration, Gregory reinvented himself at Hollywood advertising agency, BLT & Associates, where he works on major film and television releases. Gregory’s original concept sketch, drawn on a napkin for Stephen Spielberg, eventually became the iconic DREAMWORKS logo of the boy fishing on the crescent moon.

 

Gregory Weir-Quiton, ink and pen drawing

Gregory Weir-Quiton, pencil drawings on paper, for Bullocks Wilshire.

Gregory Weir-Quiton, Pencil on paper drawing for Bullocks Wilshire.

Through painting and object making, Alex Becerra pays homage to the lowly footwear traditionally worn in rural settings by Mexican laborers or in urban environments as “Gang-style Street wear” when the sandals are worn with white tube socks. The painting and object combination of huaraches references the artist’s Mexican-American heritage. The artist constructed traditional Mexican huaraches out of sheets of dried acrylic paint that were cut and woven by hand, to mimic the authentic leather sandals. Becerra’s engaging oil paintings are placed on the wall behind his real-life shoe subjects for maximum effect.

Phyllis Green is a Los Angeles artist, educator and curator who is interested in “integrating gender politics and craft.” Primarily a sculptor, she also works in performance, installation and video. Her contribution to the show is a soft sculpture, a lotus flower shape, crafted from sheepskin and topped with sheepskin slippers. Born in Minneapolis, Green grew up in Winnipeg Canada and attended the University of Manitoba. In 1978 she moved to Los Angeles and earned an MFA from UCLA in 1981. Green has lectured globally and has held various teaching positions at UCLA, USC at Loyola Marymount University. (3: From Artist Bio and Wikipedia, Phyllis Green)

Green’s “formally beautiful body of work somehow engages art history, contemporary social and political issues and heartfelt mystical spirituality without missing a beat” – Doug Harvey

 

Alex Becerra, L-R: NIKE Waffle Racer, 2019, oil on linen. Actual NIKE Waffle Racer shoes displayed on shelf below. Self Portrait with Huaraches, 2019, oil on canvas. Huaraches, 2013, hand-woven acrylic paint, displayed on shelf below.

Artist Phyllis Green, with her sculpture “Stepping on a Lotus”

A Step Beyond: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful curated by Jo Lauria now showing virtually at the Ben Maltz Gallery, OTIS.

Katie Nartonis is a 20th century design specialist, curator and filmmaker with over 20 years experience in the auction field. She is passionate about the work of the post-war California studio artists and craftsmen. She is currently co-authoring a book on the San Diego maker Jack Roger Hopkins. More info at at www.thenartonisproject.com.
Cubcoats Takes Part in Amazon’s BIG STYLE Sale!

Cubcoats Takes Part in Amazon’s BIG STYLE Sale!

If you’re on the lookout for special deals for kiddos, Cubcoats has you covered!
Now part of Amazon’s BIG STYLE SALE, and for a limited time only — you can snag select styles and masks from
Cubcoats for up to 50% off! The sale is already underway, and ends on 6/28. Sure, it may be summer, but it doesn’t hurt to secure an early holiday or birthday present!
Featuring characters from beloved collaborations with Paw Patrol, Star Wars, Disney, Marvel and more – these cute and cuddly transforming zip-ups have never been more accessible. Still in need of a mask for your little one? Cubcoats’ kid-friendly reusable masks are also included in the sale; a solution for making this ‘new normal’ easier than ever for reluctant cubs. Previously a #1 seller on Amazon Prime Day, select styles start at $25, and will be on sale through 6/28. Parent and kid approved, Cubcoats has options for every child looking to take playtime adventures to the next level.
 
 
Father’s Day

Father’s Day

In America, you would have to give Sonora Smart Dodd credit for the creation of the holiday that has come to be known as Fathers Day. The first Father’s Day was celebrated June 19, 1910, in Spokane, Washington. Although observance of the holiday faded in the 1920s over time, the idea of Father’s Day became popular and embraced across the nation. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson sent a telegraph to Spokane praising Father’s Day services. William Jennings Bryan was another early admirer of the observance. In 1966, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed a presidential proclamation declaring the third Sunday of June as Father’s Day. In 1972, President Nixon established a permanent national observance of Father’s Day to be held on the 3rd Sunday of June each year. And here we are—ready to celebrate greats Dad’s everywhere. While going to his favorite steakhouse may not happen, giving the good gift can be a cause for celebration.

FOR THE DAD WHO LOVES MOVIES

Bang & Olufsen has the bar in luxurious cinematic experiences with the launch of the Beovision Harmony 88-inch TV – Bang & Olufsen’s most luxurious and immersive TV experience that features not only the world’s first 88-inch 8K OLED TV, but also the largest OLED screen ever created from LG Electronics. Beovision Harmony was first revealed at Milan Design Week in 2019, and presents a meaningful combination of art and technology, where the TV folds down into a sculptural shape when not in use. The two-meter-wide Beovision Harmony TV, with an 8K resolution, delivering four times more detail than 4K TV and 16 times more than HDTV, it is designed to deliver stunning picture quality, upgraded performance and artificial intelligence-enabled features that brings movies and sports to life like never before imagined. As for the sound, along with the pre-installed three-channel sound system and built-in dual subwoofer, the TV is compatible with Bang & Olufsen’s speaker program, allowing one to connect up to eight wireless Beolab speakers for true 7.1 surround sound. Colorways: Natural Oak Wood, Fabric, Smoked Oak and Walnut.

88” | $49,000

FOR THE DAD WHO LOVES AN ADVENTURE

With a refined, compact design, the new Beosound A1 offers the best music experience to date. Punchy, True360 omnidirectional sound makes this speaker the natural center of attention, while the Multipoint feature lets two devices connect and control the tunes. The durable Beosound A1 is waterproof and completely resistant to dust and sand. From the beach to the bathtub the music will keep playing wherever you bring it – or accidentally drop it. Pick a song, check the news, or organise your day without moving a finger. Beosound A1 now fully supports Alexa Voice Assistant. With music playing at normal listening volume, there’s no need to raise your voice to be heard. Colorways: Grey Mist and Black Anthracite.

FOR THE DAD WHO LOVES TO PARTY

Beoplay A9 is a one-point music system and contemporary design icon with powerful sound and customizable design. Beoplay A9 fills any room with detailed Bang & Olufsen Signature Sound thanks to its powerful 480-watt digital amplifier system. Built-in room adaptation adjusts the sound perfectly to its surroundings, so you can experience your music the way the artists intended. Like a piece of furniture can place Beoplay A9 in a corner, out in a room or hang it on a wall with the optional wall bracket – the built-in room adaption switch ensures that the your speaker always sounds as good as it looks. Colorways: Black, White, Anthracite/Dark Oak, Bronze Tone and Brass Tone.

FOR THE DAD WHO LOVES WORK AS MUCH AS HE DOES MUSIC

The over-ear headphones deliver Bang & Olufsen Signature Sound with advanced ANC. The acoustics are expertly tuned by our sound engineers to deliver rich and powerful listening experiences. Transparency Mode lets you hear your surroundings, when you need to for 25 hours of playtime. This time with a dedicated button for voice assistant (via Google Assistant). This feature lets you manage your life on the go. Simply press and hold the dedicated voice button and your assistant is ready for you. The elegant over-ear cushions wrap your ears in soft lambskin and adaptive memory foam for an ultra-comfortable fit, even during extended use. Polished, anodised aluminum and genuine cowhide leather complete our most luxurious design yet. Colorways: Anthracite (limited edition) Grey Mist (limited edition), Matte Black, Argilla Bright and Peony (limited edition).

$500

Let Dad slip into this...

Paul Stuart Footwear

Heath Velvet Slip-On

The footwear of Kings and Princes everywhere — this is like walking in Cashmere.

 

$275

The Sweet Smell of Success

Here’s fact: you are going to return to public life at some point and you want to make an impression. Have you ever been in a elevator and someone is wearing something that immediately says, yes! Likely it would be Tom Ford’s Noir Extreme. And if that’s enough to convince you, the florid copywriting should do it: “Noir Extreme is an amber-drenched, woody oriental fragrance with a tantalizing heart. Incredible notes of coriander, black plum, black fig, patchouli, and leather evoke pure, seductive masculinity, while the addition of black truffle makes this daring scent extraordinary.” oh my.

 

 

$104

Here Comes the Sun

You will totally be inspired by just the bottle alone. Simply magnificent and enchanting, Rey Sol Anejo has found a way to bottle sunshine. Founded in 1886 by Don Delfino Gonzalez, the master of this Tequila empire ages its Tequila in French oak barrels for a minimum of 5 years in order to bring out the most pleasant flavors of caramel, vanilla, and spice to tantalize the pallet. It’s a little bit of sunshine on the tongue, which is what you will find, starting with the uniquely designed, smiling sunny bottle. This bottle sells for $400 each.

$400

Travelocity Presents: How to Safecation

Travelocity Presents: How to Safecation

Safe•ca•tion(noun) A mini getaway to destinations that are cleared for safe travel during this time.

 

Los Angeles, CA (June 12, 2020) – If the temperatures lately aren’t telling, Memorial Day is the unofficial kickoff to summer — a time when many families look forward to annual vacations with extended family, wondrous road trips, and weekends spent by the water. As many states start to re-open, many are considering what family travel looks like under our ‘new normal’ and accompanying best practices since COVID19. Travelocity predicts a new travel trend will appear this summer – The Safecation 

72% of travelers say health & safety are their top priority when deciding where and when to travel post COVID-19, and Travelocity’s team of experts have offered custom tips on how to plan your travels for the months ahead.

 

How to Plan a Safecation 

1. Consider The Booking Window:  

  • Short-term: Seeing an uptick in bookings 0-3 days out, experts suggest travelers are waiting to book. 

  • Long-term: Expect to see good values on airfare and travel this summer, if you know where you’re headed, it’s advised to book those trips 60+ days out. 

2. Search for Flexible Change/Cancel Policies: 

  • Airfare: We are seeing low fares on major U.S. airlines like Delta, American and many are waiving normal change or cancel fees through the end of year. So if you do change your mind, you’ll only pay the difference in ticket price.

  • Hotels w/ free cancellation: Sites like Travelocity prominently feature filters on-site to easily find and book hotels with free cancellation.

3. Look for Cleanliness Information On-Site:

  • Many hotels on Travelocity.com can now highlight their cleanliness policies to show what health & hygiene amenities they offer such as contactless check-in/check-out, hand sanitizer for guests, enhanced cleaning practices, social distancing measures, etc. 

4. Roam Near Home: 

    • Home is Where the (Traveler’s) Heart Is: 

      • Travelocity is seeing the most hotel bookings right now within 100-mile radius of where people live. 

      • Travelers are mostly booking domestic travel, within driving distance.

    • Create a Backyard Bucket List: This is the summer to take those in-state trips to landmarks and places you’ve always meant to visit as a family. 

5. Control what you can:

    • Consider non-peak travel times: Plan for weekends to be busy and try to shift travel to Saturday-Monday or mid-week, to avoid larger crowds.

    • Revisit destinations you’ve been to before: There’s a feeling of comfort when we visit places we know well. Take this time to revisit those hidden gems you’ve enjoyed before. 

Quick and Easy Workouts

Quick and Easy Workouts

Quick and Easy Workouts to Add to Your WFH Routines

Have you gained the dreaded quarantine 15? Perhaps you’re new to the WFH world, and you are wondering how on earth you can squeeze fitness into your day with your responsibilities. Juggling homeschooling and childcare with an increased workload can leave you crunched for time.

Have no fear. The following routines will get you moving in a jiffy with no need to devote a full hour to your home gym. You can squeeze fitness in short bursts and still work every muscle, including your heart before you lie down at night to count sheep.

1. Five Minute Morning Yoga

If your morning routine involves slapping snooze while scrolling social media, you miss the ideal time to start your day healthfully. Instead, roll out your yoga mat — or use your bed as a replacement. Perform five minutes of gentle yoga to get your blood flowing. Use this time to focus your mind by setting an intention for your day as well.

If you aren’t sure what to do, you don’t have to spend a dime on lessons. You can find tons of yoga videos on YouTube, many in the 5-minute range. Maybe you won’t jump out of bed singing “Zippedy Doo Dah,” but you’ll feel energized instead of grumpy as you pour that first cup of a.m. ambition.

2. Coffee Brewing Ab Blaster

Did you forget to add the french roast to the pot before you went to bed? While your morning cuppa brews, take the opportunity to engage your core for the day. You can perform several different exercises at your desk as you review your to-do list.

Do chair crunches by leaning back and holding the armrests to steady yourself. Contract your abs and round your lower spine as you bring your knees up toward your chest — take care not to bump them on your desk. Hold for three seconds, then repeat. You can also do bicycles and leg lifts from the same starting position.

3. Morning Break Calisthenics

Calisthenics may sound old-fashioned, but these exercises stood the test of time because they work. Keep light hand weights in your office and use your morning stretch break to perform the following 5-minute routine:

  • Mountain climbers: Get into a pushup position or place your hands on your desk. “Run” in place by bringing your knees to your chest.
  • Pushups: Perform ten repetitions. You can experiment with varying your hand positions if you like.
  • Stationary lunges: With a weight in each hand, step one foot forward, the other back. Make sure your front knee doesn’t extend over your toe when you bend it at a 90-degree angle. Lower down and lift, repeating ten times each leg.
  • Triceps dips: Place your hands on your desk behind you. Keeping your glutes close to the structure, lower and lift yourself ten times.
  • Dumbbell rows: Place one weight in each hand and hinge forward approximately 45-degrees at the hip. Pull the weights up like you’re starting a lawnmower, then lower and perform ten repetitions.

4. Pre-Lunch Boogie

Finally, the noon bell rings, and you’re famished. While your healthy homemade frozen burrito zaps, get your blood flowing by cranking up one of your favorite jams. If you do Zumba, you can choreograph one song. If you don’t engage in regular dance fitness, merely let loose like no one is watching — except maybe your littles, who can get in on the fun.

5. Post-Snack Stroll

Once you eat lunch, you might feel a bit of lassitude creep in — combat it with exercise. Get in the habit of taking a 10-minute stroll after your midday meal. The fresh air will improve your overall mood and boost your afternoon productivity.

6. Afternoon Mini Tabata

Tabata is a specific form of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) that is a complete four-minute workout of alternating effort and rest. You do 20 seconds of work followed by 10 seconds of relaxation. Since you’re only doing one round, select a cardio move like jumping jacks or burpees. Getting your blood flowing will help you to overcome the 3 p.m. slump.

7. After Work Heart Rate HIIT

When you finally power down your laptop for the day, it’s time for a slightly lengthier full-body workout. Select four moves — one cardio, one upper body, one lower body and one core. Perform each move Tabata-style, and you’ll have worked all your major muscle groups in under 20 minutes. You might try jogging in place, military presses, squats and situps.Try a compound move like combining your squat with your overhead press to get even more bang for your mini-workout buck.

8. Evening Stretch Into Sleep

Before lying your head on the pillow to rest, take anywhere from 5 to 15 minutes to do yoga. You can find routines for free on YouTube that you can perform on your mattress. Make sure you finish by lying in savasana — and if you drift off, it’s okay.

Get Your Workout in While WFH With These Mini-Workouts

You might feel pulled in 20 directions in your new WFH lifestyle, and you might struggle to squeeze in fitness. The mini-workouts above last no more than 15 minutes apiece, but combining some or all of them will engage your whole body without making you feel more time-pressed.

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