New Atlas of American Style

New Atlas of American Style

From the forthcoming book with Vogue entitled THE UNITED STATES OF FASHION: A NEW ATLAS OF AMERICAN STYLE which will  be publishied on September 7th.

 

An expanded look at Vogue’s February 2021 issue which launched their project, this book celebrates creators, artisans, and visionaries across the country, paying tribute to the democratization of American fashion. Organized by region and providing additional context for the designers and craftspeople featured, the book offers a wealth of new material and is presented in an entirely different way from the printed magazine. Including an introductory essay by Anna Wintour, the book also features never-before-seen photographs and anecdotes, not published in the pages of Vogue, from fashion designers Laura and Kate Mulleavy of Rodarte; Jeremy Scott, and Libertine; photographers Alex Webb and June Canedo; and craftspeople Ariana Boussard-Reifel and Ataumbi Metals, to name a few. The book also contains texts by esteemed writers, from Louise Erdrich’s words on Native American fashion and music editor Suzy Exposito’s account of being goth in Miami, to new ways of creating sustainable, recycled fashion.

The editors of Vogue, the ultimate authority on fashion, document the post-COVID changes happening across the fashion landscape in America. Celebrating creators, artisans, and visionaries across the country, the book pays tribute to the democratization of American fashion and the creativity and artisanship that is no longer confined to the runways of New York and Los Angeles.

FASHION HAS LONG mythologized the American West, forging certain staples—gauzy dresses, cowboy boots—from its history and lore. Today, however, a growing number of designers are reworking those old codes and points of reference, finding inspiration in sources as wonderfully varied as Montana and New Mexico’s Indigenous cultures, Hollywood, Las Vegas, and the surf in Southern California. If they have anything in common, it’s a shared spirit of free-dom and adventure, one articulated by The Elder Statesman’s Greg Chait. “We are about being free-spirited—that’s what we have in Los Angeles,” he says. “Fashion isn’t L.A.’s first language, but creativity is.”