A STEP BEYOND: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful

A STEP BEYOND: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful

The Los Angeles art world, like the broader society, is struggling with how to continue to operate during the Covid-19 Pandemic. Art galleries and museums all over the Southland have shuttered their doors and installations have languished in darkened rooms, without visitors. Interesting solutions have emerged to tackle this difficult challenge. One solution is to create fully digital visiting tools, which enables show-goers to visit an art space from the comfort and safety of their home.
A fabulous 2020 design show entitled “A STEP BEYOND: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful” has recently graced the galleries at the venerable Otis College of Art and Design. While the gallery doors for A STEP BEYOND were prematurely closed to the public in mid-March, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, show curator Lauria and gallery staff pivoted quickly and were able to digitize the show experience. The OTIS team has created an online tour of the show including a virtual curator tour, which is coming soon.
Otis is a private college, founded in 1918, which was the first independent professional school of art established in Los Angeles. The Ben Maltz Gallery on campus features a full slate of art and design shows throughout the calendar year. Guest curator, Jo Lauria has created a knock-out show for the space. On the Ben Maltz gallery site, there is now a 60-image slide show complete with didactic information. While nothing can replace the visceral experience of seeing a beautifully designed art show in person, during the time of social distancing this is certainly a healthy and welcome option. The full show can be accessed at:  https://www.otis.edu/ben-maltz-gallery/step-beyond-contemporary-footwear-functional-to-fanciful

“At the beginning of the War we were limited to the prescribed boot for walking…now our choice of shoes has become more unlimited than ever, and the subject of footwear fascinating enough to talk about at length.”– Vogue Magazine, 1918

Humans have an intimate relationship with shoes. In the time of pre-history, our ancestors utilized woven grasses and animal hide to wrap the foot for needed warmth and protection. Fast forward to our modern age, and footwear – even our perception of it – has changed radically. We now universally obsess over the design, concept and look of the shoes we wear and collect. For some, shoes are the ultimate status symbol.

 

 

A STEP BEYOND show, Otis Alumni shoes, L-R: Anna Miller (above), Alexandria Felix and Jacob Kim (below)

Historical shoes on display representing decades from 1900 through 2010, “A Step Beyond”

Rem D. Koolhas, “Mobius” shoe progression for United Nude, 2003-2016. UNITED NUDE, a global lifestyle brand co-founded by Rem D. Koolhaas, combines fashion, architecture, and design to produce footwear with an “alternative attitude.”

Situated at the intersection of art and design, A STEP BEYOND explores the complex relationship between fashion, footwear, society and culture – focusing on the past 110 years. The exhibition features contemporary footwear from a variety of perspectives, including custom shoes designed and handcrafted for a private client; luxury, limited-edition creations made for a privileged clientele; and shoes mass-produced for the consumer market.

“Footwear reflects the imagination, innovation, and artistry of its time.”– Jo Lauria, curator

A STEP BEYOND also includes footwear related artworks and showcases the imagination and technical prowess invested in human foot covering. The show features five shoe collections, (including twenty-one collectible sneakers), and eighty-five historical shoes, dating from 1900 through 2010. Twenty-three international artists, craftsmen and architects are represented including luminaries such as Andy Warhol, Rem D. Koolhaas and Zaha Hadid.

Zaha Hadid “NOVA” shoe for United Nude

Paul Kaufman for pskaufman shoes. Kaufman, has worked for international companies Dr. Martens, Na Na, Fornarina, Rocket Dog, Twin Star, and London Underground.

 The enduring allure of the Cowboy boot, A Step Beyond

The show is smartly divided into seven distinctive categories, outlined by the curator as follows:

The shoe as functional footwear – encompassing custom designed and handcrafted shoes for private clients, luxury, limited-edition creations for privileged clientele, and mass-produced shoes for the consumer market

The shoe as structure, sculpture and performance gear: highlighting artists/designers who successfully merge functionality with freedom of expression and the extend the shoe into other artistic realms.

The shoe as fashion marker: charting fashion trends and key developments in 20th and 21st century design.

The shoe as composition: focusing on the illustrated shoe as fashion’s most important accessory.

The shoe beyond literal object: Featuring the shoe as protagonist in individual artistic narratives.

The shoe as collectible: centering on the phenomenon of shoe collectors and their collections.

The shoe as design challenge: Otis alumni and faculty rise to the challenge of creating footwear with flair.

By separating the exhibit into these distinct categories, the viewer is encouraged to think about the shoe not only in its historical context, but to see it as a practical object and an art/luxury object. The various ways artists and designers think about, and approach the shoe, is the focus.

Ill-fitting or supportive, teetering or flat, silent or squeaky, restrictive or ergonomic, the forms surrounding our feet ask us to weigh nature against desire, and the outcome of this equation, when tipped even slightly toward one side or another, has the ability to impact every inch of our bodies and our understanding of ourselves.” – Amara Hark-Weber, bespoke shoemaker

Highlighting the artists who have participated in the exhibit, it was indeed tempting to try to cover every maker in the show, as they all have fascinating stories and create beautiful work. I’ve chosen a handful of contributors to highlight whom I feel capture the spirit of the exhibit.

 

The shoe as collectible, A STEP BEYOND, featuring a selection from the sneaker collection of Twin Daniel, and high-fashion shoes from the collections of Jean Concoff and Pamela Weir-Quiton.

Elisabeth Thorsen wearing her handcrafted leather Rose Maling shoes embellished with fresh water pearls, antique beads and gold thread, with hand-carved wood soles and heels, 2013; and on dinner plate is her handmade shoe Tsar Saltan, embossed leather, hand-carved wood soles and heels, 2013.

Elisabeth Thorsen, L-R: Easy Ticket to Hoppa-Hage, 2017, marbleized vegetable leather-chalk heels; Polka, 2018, Goodyear welted shoes, vegetable leather , hand-painted and hand-stitched details, in collaboration with Mari Jaeger, designer and Paint Me a Birdie (shoes), 2015, embroidery and EVA materials, in collaboration with Jens Stegger Ledaal; and Print from Print Me a Birdie shoes, 2015, ink on paper.

Elisabeth Thorsen is a Norwegian shoemaker and performance artist who draws inspiration from “nature, art, fairytales and 1970’s movies.”  Thorsen graduated from the Norwegian school for shoemaking in 2008 and has been making art using shoes as her primary focus ever since. Thorsen views her work as pieces of art, not merely functional objects. Her performances are both live and captured in digital video. She prefers to craft her shoes with experimental, non-traditional materials such as “carpets, furniture, carved sculptural elements, drapes and even ice, sugar, pencils and sports tape.” (1: From Artist Bio, Elisabeth Thorsen)

In Gaza Bowen’s series, Shoes for the Little Woman, the shoes are fabricated mostly from cleaning products that serve as a parody for the stereotype of the happy housewife who “enjoys” housework.  Gaza first learned her craft in 1976 at Colonial Williamsburg from a master cobbler. Gaza dedicated nearly twenty years to honing her construction skills and representing the shoe’s “cultural meaning and social significance” in both functional footwear and sculptural applications. 

“The works on display provide a focused look into the extraordinary life of Gaza Bowen. If anyone can claim the territory of “progenitor of sculptural shoes,” it is Gaza: she originated the concept of ‘narrative’ footwear that combines humor, unusual materials, invention, attitude, and social commentary.” – Jo Lauria, curator

Gaza, who passed away in 2005, noted “there’s more (to the shoes) for the person that cares to look. In that humor, I’m trying to make a statement about women and fashion, and women and household cleaning, and women as sex symbols.”

 

Helen Chung is an LA artist who works in multiple medium including installation, painting and photography. Drawing on popular culture, literature, and her former experience in accessory design, the artist attempts to “debunk social and cultural myths surrounding the notions of possession, desire, objectification, commodity, and commerce.”   “The two bodies of work on exhibit,” adds the artist, “are displayed in a boutique style with shoes and bags, except the items displayed are only containers of such objects. The boxes and the deconstructed shopping bags engage in a dialogue between intuition and intention, outlining two different processes: one planned with specific outcome, the other, a spontaneous process allowing whim and chance. The work ironically challenges the fixed notion of containers, as merely an external protection or subordinate transporting aid, not quite qualifying as an entity in itself.”  By focusing on the container, and the concept of containment, curator Jo Lauria notes “Helen maintains the integrity of the shoebox and the shopping bag by not adding anything or taking anything away.”

Bespoke shoemaker, Amara Hark-Weber considers the shoe “an extension of body, vehicle, representation of personal identity, inhibitor to/enhancer of movement, metaphor, fetish form, or simply utilitarian object.” Through sculptural footwear, Hark-Weber seeks to question our ideas of function and what we are willing to subject our bodies to. 

‘My sculptural footwear is an exploration of human movement, building techniques, and visual metaphor. They are objects that come alive with personal narrative when worn, with the power to challenge the viewer’s ideas about form, function, body, and movement.”– Amara Hark-Weber

 

Elisabeth Thorsen, Shizaru (4th Monkey Boot), 2018, leather, hand-carved wood heels. Carving by Trude Johansen, detail.

Gaza Bowen, “Little Woman AM” shoes, 1995, leather, rubber foam, linoleum, plastic bottles, dish scrubbers.

Gaza Bowen, Shoes for the Angry Little Woman, 1990, knives, potato peelers, rhinestones, skewers, scouring pads, kidskin, wood, paint, embroidered cloth, rose twigs, nail polish.

 

Helen Chung, Shoe Boxes and Shopping Bags

Amara Hark-Weber, shoe designer-maker in her studio.

Amara Hark-Weber, L-R: Muscle Memory: Equilibrium, 2013, cork, kidskin, thread; Muscle Memory: Opposition, 2013, kidskin, thread, hardware; Muscle Memory: Regrounding, 2013, basswood, kidskin.

“Andy Warhol glorified the shoe by using it as the sole seductive element of his still-life drawings, devoting entire portfolios to illustrations of women’s footwear.” – Jo Lauria, curator

The show also features artists who use images of shoes in their work. Spirited pen and ink drawings of shoes by Andy Warhol are included. According to the exhibition didactic, Andy Warhol began his career as a commercial artist in New York City in the 1940s and self-published hand-colored prints of his campy and glamorous shoes. 

“Widely distributed in fashion magazines such as Glamour and Vogue, Warhol’s illustrations elevated the pump to an object of desire.”  – Jo Lauria, curator 

Joshua Wong’s artwork of glamorous shoes, reflects his life-long love of footwear as luxury item. Inspired by the Upper East Side ladies of Manhattan hailing cabs in their 4-inch heels, Wong launched a successful career designing women’s footwear and handbags. Wong’s love for fashion illustration began in childhood when he was four years old, when his parents noticed that he was drawing high-heeled shoes and racing cars. He later mastered these skills at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. 

After a career in advertising Ralph Lauren hired Joshua to be his women’s collection footwear designer. There, he was involved in “the fast-paced world of runway shows and super models.” While traveling to Paris, Milan and London, Joshua was inspired to capture even more stories of fashion and design. Later on, he became the vice president of footwear design at Banana Republic.  Joshua currently enjoys developing the next generation of designers as a mentor at various schools and is an official mentor at his alma mater, Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. (2: From Artist Bio, Joshua Wong)

Amara Hark-Weber – Measurements, a work in progress

Andy Warhol, reproductions of original ink and pen drawings of shoes. Courtesy of Sotheby’s photography.

Joshua Wong, “Snake Shoe” ink and pen drawing on paper

Gregory Weir-Quiton is a legendary fashion illustrator who can usually be seen at Los Angeles art events, sitting in the middle of the crowd, drawing from life. 

“My passion is drawing the contemporary figure. Fashion design obviously influences my work since what intrigues me is how people design themselves (and everyone does). The drawing is an end in itself and I rarely add anything once the pose is over.” – Gregory Weir-Quiton

As a young person Weir-Quiton saw a fashion illustration in the local Detroit newspaper, and he knew he had found his calling. He graduated from Cass Tech High School, majoring in fashion illustration and then received a scholarship to Art Students League. He worked in New York and Chicago before moving to Los Angeles. In Los Angeles, he met and married his wife Pamela Weir-Quiton a celebrated wood worker. Her fantastic collection of shoe wear is featured in the exhibit. For 35 years, Gregory worked with major California retailers in the fashion industry including, THE MAY COMPANY, ROBINSONS, BULLOCKS, THE BROADWAY and I. MAGNIN. In this role, Gregory honed his skills of drawing shoes for advertisements. He would later refine these skills to create his more personal fashion illustrations of the human figure, accessorized.  After a long career in fashion illustration, Gregory reinvented himself at Hollywood advertising agency, BLT & Associates, where he works on major film and television releases. Gregory’s original concept sketch, drawn on a napkin for Stephen Spielberg, eventually became the iconic DREAMWORKS logo of the boy fishing on the crescent moon.

 

Gregory Weir-Quiton, ink and pen drawing

Gregory Weir-Quiton, pencil drawings on paper, for Bullocks Wilshire.

Gregory Weir-Quiton, Pencil on paper drawing for Bullocks Wilshire.

Through painting and object making, Alex Becerra pays homage to the lowly footwear traditionally worn in rural settings by Mexican laborers or in urban environments as “Gang-style Street wear” when the sandals are worn with white tube socks. The painting and object combination of huaraches references the artist’s Mexican-American heritage. The artist constructed traditional Mexican huaraches out of sheets of dried acrylic paint that were cut and woven by hand, to mimic the authentic leather sandals. Becerra’s engaging oil paintings are placed on the wall behind his real-life shoe subjects for maximum effect.

Phyllis Green is a Los Angeles artist, educator and curator who is interested in “integrating gender politics and craft.” Primarily a sculptor, she also works in performance, installation and video. Her contribution to the show is a soft sculpture, a lotus flower shape, crafted from sheepskin and topped with sheepskin slippers. Born in Minneapolis, Green grew up in Winnipeg Canada and attended the University of Manitoba. In 1978 she moved to Los Angeles and earned an MFA from UCLA in 1981. Green has lectured globally and has held various teaching positions at UCLA, USC at Loyola Marymount University. (3: From Artist Bio and Wikipedia, Phyllis Green)

Green’s “formally beautiful body of work somehow engages art history, contemporary social and political issues and heartfelt mystical spirituality without missing a beat” – Doug Harvey

 

Alex Becerra, L-R: NIKE Waffle Racer, 2019, oil on linen. Actual NIKE Waffle Racer shoes displayed on shelf below. Self Portrait with Huaraches, 2019, oil on canvas. Huaraches, 2013, hand-woven acrylic paint, displayed on shelf below.

Artist Phyllis Green, with her sculpture “Stepping on a Lotus”

A Step Beyond: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful curated by Jo Lauria now showing virtually at the Ben Maltz Gallery, OTIS.

Katie Nartonis is a 20th century design specialist, curator and filmmaker with over 20 years experience in the auction field. She is passionate about the work of the post-war California studio artists and craftsmen. She is currently co-authoring a book on the San Diego maker Jack Roger Hopkins. More info at at www.thenartonisproject.com.
The Art of Wood

The Art of Wood

The art of making furniture is universal—it is a craft, an ancient craft that requires patience and a profound knowledge of wood. Japan is nearly 70% forest, which has provided an ample supply—dating back 1,300 years. Perched in the retail epicenter of Hollywood and Highland is Japan House, an oasis of creativity and calm.  It is there that we found this current exhibit with a display of beautiful woodwork seen here for the first time.

JAPAN HOUSE Los Angeles is proud to announce the exhibition “HIDA | A Woodwork Tradition in the Making,” which brings Japanese woodcraft from its spiritual homeland of the Hida region of Japan to Los Angeles for the first time. On display from January 16 through April 12, the exhibition invites visitors to discover the legendary craftsmen of Hida and their design legacy today, embodied in the work of century-old furniture maker Hida Sangyo Co., Ltd. Select items on display include a chair designed by the late Sori Yanagi utilizing wood-bending techniques native to Hida and part of the permanent collection at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London; and a branch spoon created by Ibuki Kaiyama utilizing a traditional chiseling technique.

Located in the center of the country in Gifu Prefecture, the Hida region became known for its woodworking traditions and skilled artisans 1,300 years ago. This fame continues today through innovative design and sustainable use of the region’s forests, particularly the iconic cedar tree, in everything from contemporary furniture to fragrant aroma oils.

The furniture maker Hida Sangyo Co., Ltd was founded in the region in 1920, and for nearly a hundred years has prioritized four core principles: Forest, Human, Time and Craft. Engaging all five senses, the exhibition guides visitors to experience these themes for themselves: coexistence with the forest (Forest), consideration of inherent human needs (Human), a legacy cultivated through time (Time), and a continuous refinement of craft (Craft). Displays will highlight regional specialties such as Hida-shunkei lacquerware, Ichii wood carving (Ichii itto bori — Japanese yew carving), and mageki (wood bending), as well as materials, prototypes, and products developed by Hida Sangyo and its frequent collaborations with some of the world’s top contemporary designers, such as Enzo Mari and Sori Yanagi.

The exhibition will also spotlight where tradition meets technology and innovation, such as Hida Sangyo’s revolutionary wood compression techniques with cedar. This sustainable domestic wood is typically too soft for long-lasting furniture, but in the Hida Sangyo factory, cedar is compressed and strengthened for use in durable chairs, tables and flooring imbued with cedar’s subtle scent. As a business leader, Hida Sangyo’s success has also influenced a community of other manufacturers to stay in, or migrate to, the Hida area, furthering the time-honored mastery of the region’s woodcraft.

Exhibition Credits:
Presented by JAPAN HOUSE Los Angeles
Exhibition contents provided by Hida Sangyo Co., Ltd.
Exhibition and Graphic Design | Daigo Daikoku
Planning and Production Assistance | Intertrend Communications, Inc.
Content Contribution | Historical Archive Office, Takayama City Board of Education

For more information on all programs, please visit https://www.japanhouse.jp/losangeles

Photography by Takaya Sakano

FIDM 13th Television Costume Design Exhibit

FIDM 13th Television Costume Design Exhibit

The 13th Art of Television Costume Design exhibition is back this summer for another year of celebrating the artistry of costume designers and their teams. Television’s perpetual evolution through both network and digital platforms gives today’s designers even more opportunity to create bold, memorable characters for a variety of programming. This year’s exhibition will feature a diverse assortment of shows across several genres–science fiction fantasies, contemporary comedies, and historical dramas, to name a few–and as always will include Emmy® Award-nominated programs from the 2018-2019 television season. Look for fan favorites such as Game of Thrones, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, and Black-ish, plus discover the latest hits like The Masked Singer and Good Omens,

The exhibition is free to the public and will be held in the FIDM Museum at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising in downtown Los Angeles through Saturday, Oct. 26. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday.

For information, visit FIDMmuseum.org.

MADE Rodarte 80’s Blowout Celebration Presented By Mastercard

MADE Rodarte 80’s Blowout Celebration Presented By Mastercard

Last night, Laura and Kate Mulleavy, the talented sisters behind Rodarte, announced a limited edition capsule collection featuring “Cats!” from artist, Mari Eastman. By collaborating with Master Card (who are committed to championing women business owners), and by having their 5-piece collection sold exclusively through Fred Segal on Sunset with the new blockchain technology involved (which makes the company’s supply chain visible so you can see where and by whom your garment was made), the creative and eco-conscious sisters have a lot to celebrate.

And celebrate they did, with a huge 80’s blast-from-the-past blowout at Milk Studios. There were inflatable pink couches, popcorn and candy-corn stations, a mini game arcade with Donkey Kong, Pac-Man and Master Claw (haven’t seen those games in years), plus a fashion show on roller skates and a short, but wonderfully enjoyable, performance from Susanna Hoffs (The Bangles), who treated the enthused crowd to her hits “Manic Monday” and “Walk like an Egyptian”.

Spotted in the crowd were Rachel Bilson, Ireland Baldwin, Rowan Blanchard, Skai Jackson, Hunter Schafer and Nikki Reed. In other words, a room full of beautiful ladies, all out to show their support.
The Rodarte collection is available starting today, August 2 exclusively at Fred Segal.

ABOUT MADE: MADE began as a designer discovery platform giving rise to some of the top names in fashion today, including Alexander Wang, Proenza Schouler and Jeremy Scott. MADE has evolved into a cross-cultural collaboration platform pairing fashion designers with talent across passion points. Fusing the worlds of fashion, music, art and entertainment, MADE gives consumers front row access to limited-edition capsules, one-of-a-kind collaborations, and over-the-top presentations, through both large-scale fashion festivals and tailored special events.

Susanna Hoff, co-founder of the Bangles, performs Paul Simon’s Hazy Shade of Winter.

 

For more information:

http://www.rodarte.net/

https://www.fredsegal.com/

http://ma.de/

http://www.milkstudios.com/studios/losangeles/

Christian Cowan Wows L.A. with Powerpuff Girls Inspired Collection

Christian Cowan Wows L.A. with Powerpuff Girls Inspired Collection

     

If there’s something to be said about Christian Cowan, it’s that he’s as innovative as he is fun. We’re talking about a designer who’s dressed the likes of Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, Naomi Campbell, Cardi B, Ariana Grande, and so many more, marking him as a prominent creative in the fashion industry. Amidst his well-deserved success, Cowan chose to celebrate women on International Women’s Day with a thoroughly captivating runway experience in Downtown L.A. at the City Market Social House showcasing his “Powerpuff Girls” inspired capsule collection.

The partnership came directly from Cartoon Network, the very network that first aired “The Powerpuff Girls” in 1998. In a continued celebration of the show’s 20th anniversary, Cartoon Network saw it fit to align itself with Christian Cowan to develop a collection that not only celebrates a pop culture phenomenon like “The Powerpuff Girls,” but also furthers the notion that women and girls can be powerful at any age.

The Powerpuff Girls have always been part of a broader pop cultural celebration around ‘girl power,’ said Jill King SVP, Marketing and Partnerships, Cartoon Network and Boomerang.Christian’s take on the many complex aspects of femininity, along with his originality and fearlessness as a creator, makes this a perfect collaboration to bring the message of empowering girls and women of all ages to life.

The collaboration between Cowan and The Powerpuff Girls will also benefit and support She’s the First (STF), as a means to further promote the nonprofit’s mission to fight gender inequality through education. STF believes that a girl with an education is unstoppable!

I am thrilled to be partnering with such an iconic brand whose message is about supporting one another and kicking butt no matter your age, size or gender,” says Cowan. “I grew up watching The Powerpuff Girls, and I am so lucky to have the opportunity to create a collection inspired by characters that advocate for sisterhood and positivity.

   

SoCal Mag was all for the nostalgia and appreciated Cowan’s attention to detail through design from the show’s inspiration. Hues of the iconic blue, green, and pink donned by the Powerpuff Girls’ uniform were seen throughout the collection with additional nods to other notable characters from the show like Miss Sara Bellum and the Girls’ arch nemesis, Mojo Jojo.

Celebrities in attendance included: Paris Hilton, Heidi Klum, Erika Jayne, Tinashe, Amanda Steele, Kollin Carter, Carly Rae Jepsen, Monique Coleman, Betty Who, Skai Jackson, Kim Petras, Draya Michelle, Shaun Ross, Julissa Bermudez, Francia Raisa, EJ King, Gia Gunn, Max Emerson, Marta Pozzan, Megan Pormer, Patrick Starrr, Christa Allen, Madison Grace, Niia Bertino, Ginta Bertino, Nikita Dragun, Jazzmyne Roberts, Khrystyana Kazakova, and Lindsay Webster.

CREDITS:

Styling – Patti Wilson; Hair – Bumble & Bumble; Makeup – MAC; Music – Ty Sutherland; Production – IMG Focus

Check the rest of the looks at the gallery below:

(Photo Credit: Mark Hill Photography)

MOBS Brings in Father’s Day with a New Shoe Style

MOBS Brings in Father’s Day with a New Shoe Style

Father’s Day is right around the corner, and instead of brainstorming the many ways to make dad feel appreciated, families can look to MOBS Footwear. MOBS is delivering a brand new style, sure to impress people everywhere. This new look, named Grid is perfect for the busy ‘cool dads’ who jump from meetings in the office, to their kids’ soccer practice right after.

The Grid set’s stretch knit upper maximizes breathability, and a nested elastic and leather mid-foot strap provides support and stability while maintaining a clean minimal aesthetic. The sleek “Grid” EVA midsole delivers lightweight cushioning, and the rubber outsole assures both flexibility and traction. Easy to slip on and available in two different color-ways — it works for all dads alike! The new Grid style maintains MOBS’ signature mobility and comfort, yet introduces a new type of versatility that is appropriate for a quick round on the golf course, business meetings, travel, walks at the park, or just getting a drink at the bar.

Visit https://mobsdesign.com/ to get the “dadpreneur” in your life a stylish and functional set of shoes that will keep him moving from business to casual without skipping a beat!

DesignerCon 2017 Brings The Creative Juice – Video

DesignerCon 2017 Brings The Creative Juice – Video

           

Attending  DesignerCon 2017 was like walking into a creative wonderland. This annual  art and design convention is specifically catered to highlight design mediums like paintings, sculptures, toys, and pop culture art. It’s literally a “creative nerd’s” fantasy come true. Held at the Pasadena Convention Center on November 11th and 12th, DesignerCon showed no limits to a variety of design concepts from mainstream artists and apparel designers to underground art enthusiasts.

           

Don’t expect to find common art commodities at DesignerCon. The featured artists are experts at challenging the status quo, veering far away from conventional ideas of art. Part of this convention’s magic is the ability to experience the oddities and learn from the artist directly through panels led by some of the World’s top designers across multiple categories. The panels served to not only showcase in-depth dialogue with the artists’ work but to also enlighten attendees on the business aspect of design and how to navigate the art world professionally.

           

For first-time attendees, here are my beginner’s tips to Designer Con:

  1. Save some money before you attend! – Art can be expensive, and at an event like DesignerCon, impulse buys are certainly going to come up. You’re going to want to splurge, so be prepared. I personally wanted to take home every piece of superhero art in the room.
  2. Get to know the artists. – More often than not, opportunities to meet one on one with these artists are rare. This convention allows attendees to really connect with them and learn from them directly. You’d be surprised to learn what their intended interpretations are from a lot of their work.
  3. Expand your mind and perception. – We all have different artistic tastes, but DesignerCon was created to shatter those preconceived notions and to expand your knowledge and view on non-traditional art pieces. Have an open mind.

I’ll definitely be attending DesignerCon next year. Be sure to check for updates on their website HERE. Below is a quick recap on the experience.

http://https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BysC7WGNi34&t=18s

Shaquille Woods is from Marion, Arkansas and loves his Southern roots. He graduated from Arkansas State University with a degree in Creative Media, and is currently a freelance social/entertainment journalist for the Los Angeles Sentinel Newspaper. Creativity plays a major role in his life to include video, photography, and graphic design skills. His own ShaqThisOut brand explores all creative entertainment in the Los Angeles area.
Jorge Ayala at PERI.A Trunk Show Alert

Jorge Ayala at PERI.A Trunk Show Alert

PERI.A Los Angeles will be hosting a special trunk show for Designer Jorge Ayala this Thursday October 26th.

JORGE AYALA PORTRAIT.jpg

The namesake ready-to-wear label, Jorge Ayala Paris, is founded in Paris by Mexico-born Ayala in 2013. Created for the daring and outspoken, Ayala takes a novel architectural approach to design, merging often different patterns, prints and textiles.

Jorge Ayala will be customizing limited edition denim styles designed for PERI.A exclusively at the event.

Guests will also be able to enjoy champagne, light bites, and music from 4p-8p at PER.A located at 146 N. Robertson Blvd.

Space is limited so RSVP today [email protected]

Fashion & Coding Come Together at CS+X Dress Code Event At Google Venice

Fashion & Coding Come Together at CS+X Dress Code Event At Google Venice

For it’s third installment, the CS+X event series presented the Google Dress Code event at Google’s Venice offices on a recent Thursday evening.

In collaboration with The National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT), Miss Bella Graham Consulting, and Eileen Brown Kahn Consulting, Google presented a special event for high school students from the greater Los Angeles area that allowed them to explore how computer science can take many forms into our everyday lives, specially in fashion technology!

Photo Credit: Getty Images for Google

Photo Credit: SoCal Mag / Ely Anne Vedar

Photo Credit: SoCal Mag / Ely Anne Vedar

Students were than treated to Freeform’s The Fosters’ Cierra Ramirez introducing opening remarks by Google’s Head of CS in Media Multicultural Strategy, Daraiha Greene followed by a Keynote Speech by Founder and CEO of PlayWerks and WhizGirls Academy, Lecturer at USC Viterbi and Gamer Shirin Salemnia.

The evening’s first panel, “CS+Fashion Industry Panel” treated students in attendance to life steering career advice from industry leaders (Pictured below left to right): 3D Designer, Entrepreneur, Digital Sculptor and Co-Founder, Pixsweet – Janne Kyttanen; Jacquard by Google’s Experience Design Lead, Nina Walia; Dalia MacPhee, Celebrity Fashion Designer and Tech Innovator; 22 year old Nina Vir, Founder and CEO of Daily Dress Me; and Digital Media Strategist and Fashion Influencer, Ishmael Mayhew; Moderated by Bria Sullivan, a Software Engineer at Google.

Photo Credit: Getty Images for Google

The “Tech Style Influencers Panel” rounded off the evening with insights from (Pictured below left to right): Moderated by Jon Youshaei, a Product Marketing Manger at Google; Fashion Designer and Editor-in-Chief of Fashionlyfe.com and the BritxBrat2Fashion YouTube Channel Brittany Dke; Digital Media Strategist (Coding)/Fashion Branding Mentor, Jon Phenom; YouTuber and Owner of LA Sunnies, Ale La Chula; YouTube star, Cloe Couture; and Fashion, Lifestyle and Travel Influencer, Darren Moulden.

Visit g.co/csedu to learn more about Google’s mission to increase CS opportunities for all – regardless of gender, ethnicity, geography, or socio-economic level – and aim to inspire young people everywhere not just to use technology, but to create it.

Ely Anne Vedar

Fashion & Lifestyle Editor

While California feels like it’s always been her home, Hawaii, San Francisco, Las Vegas and the Philippines are just a few places Ely Anne has lived thus cultivating her lifelong appetite for finding, trying and sharing new adventures, especially through food and wellness activities. She loves how food can always bring people together – anywhere, any time – and that’s what fuels her passion for public relations and marketing. Ely finds it invigorating to have a hand in seeing brands thrive in their community by using her PR, marketing and event production skills. [email protected]

#FlashbackFriday: 90’s Nostalgia Comes to Life with Nickelodeon X Love Tribe Collection

#FlashbackFriday: 90’s Nostalgia Comes to Life with Nickelodeon X Love Tribe Collection

Nostalgia hit me heavy when I found out about the latest collaboration between Hybrid Apparel’s line, Love Tribe and Nickelodeon. This new collection is all about taking it back to Millennial childhood by making a nod to 90’s cartoon classics that so many of us grew up on, and personally, I’m loving every single piece! My favorite pieces include characters from hit shows like Rugrats, All That, and Hey Arnold!. You can also find pieces that feature quotes and characters from Clarissa Explains It All, The Ren & Stimpy Show, and SpongeBob SquarePants.

According to the Vice President of Sales for Specialty Retailers of Hybrid Apparel, Bonnie Dogan explained that the collection was actually in the works for a while now. She says,

We have been partners with Nickelodeon for a long time, building an incredible relationship together. We love their creativity, and combining their vision with ours was the perfect recipe for an inspiring unique apparel line. There is nothing better then remembering the past, and the things we watched and loved while growing up.

The Nickelodeon collection a retro style for fashionable millennial women. The garments possess a “throwback” feel, having been made with materials such as terry cloth and jersey, and include trendy slogans such as “Trust Me, I’m a Rugrat,” featuring Chucky Finster from Rugrats and “Haters Gonna Hate,” featuring Arnold from Hey Arnold!.

Love Tribe X Nickelodeon has officially launched this week in stores and online at Macys.com, but the line will officially kick off nationwide with a special event at Macy’s Herald Square in New York at 2:00 pm on August 26, 2017.

Make sure to follow Love Tribe on Instagram here:  @lovetribeapparel

 

 

Rumba Presents “Orchard Love” collection X James Goldcrown

Rumba Presents “Orchard Love” collection X James Goldcrown

Last weekend, I attended Beautycon LA and made sure to make the rounds across all of the different vendor booths.  I remember distinctly the #lovewall mural at the Rumba booth and found out it was in celebration of their latest partnership with artist, James Goldcrown.  The watches are gorgeous and the design is a beautiful nod to NYC street art.  See below for all official details on the collaboration, as long as where to purchase this great timepiece.

Contemporary accessories brand Rumba announces the global launch of their limited edition collaboration with artist James Goldcrown. The artist behind NYC’s most photographed street art designed the watch, with each timepiece featuring Goldcrown’s signature etched into the case back.

Named Orchard Love, this custom timepiece will be available for pre-order on RumbaTime.com on August 15, 2017.
Known for on-trend watches and accessories, Rumba is excited to partner with James Goldcrown who debuted the new style last weekend at BeautyCon LA on August 12th featuring an original “Lovewall” created for the collaboration. As friends, James Goldcrown and Rumba CEO Drew Deters wanted to work together to create a style that shares their passion of art, design, adventure, and spreading the message of love around the world.

Working with James has been a rewarding project for the brand,” says Deters, “his artwork is loved, represents love,
and is so aspirational. James’ work hits Rumba’s audience and aesthetic perfectly, it just seemed like a natural fit.

The Limited Edition Orchard Love watch features an alloy 32mm case etched with LOVE on the side, as well as the special heart pattern on the dial and crown. The genuine leather strap comes in black, white, and pink with hearts embossed on the back of the strap. Drawing inspiration from New York City, each Rumba collection is named after streets and areas of the iconic city, delivering the same vibrancy and level of style you find in these neighborhoods. As the artist of NYC’s #bleedinghearts #lovewall popular murals, the Rumba x James Goldcrown collaboration is a quintessential partnership. Notable social media stars have featured the artist including Eva Chen, Chiara Ferragni, Rocky Barnes, while Rumba celebrity fans include Olivia Palermo, Lucy Hale, and Kelsea Ballerini. The Rumba x James Goldcrown limited edition Orchard Love watch will be available for $75 on RumbaTime.com and other select retailers.

  

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