Giant Humanoids Descend Upon DTLA in “Fantastic Planet” at FIGat7th

Giant Humanoids Descend Upon DTLA in “Fantastic Planet” at FIGat7th

Gigantic, startling, illuminated, and altogether breathtaking humanoid figures will descend upon Downtown Los Angeles later this month at the FIGat7th Plaza. The Australian artist Amanda Parer’s latest must-see light installation opens Tuesday, October 30th and will live among us through November 10th.

While seemingly peaceful and ethereal, the figures are also imposing and daring. They seem to display an extraordinary curiosity for their onlookers, just as onlookers are fascinated by them. These giants from above give audiences the impression that they have just landed and are quietly observing us and gently exploring our, you guessed it, “fantastic planet.”

Parer’s edgy artworks explore the natural world and our place within it. As with Parer’s globally successful public art exhibit Intrude, these forms will not be randomly placed sculptures but are strategically placed to give the impression that the giant humanoids have taken over the entire event site and, perhaps, the world.

As Parer describes her work, “I raise questions about our relationship with the natural world. I communicate these themes by use of, scale, light, dark, humour, and drama. In these works, the audiences are enticed with beautiful, mostly invasive (which includes us) or endangered species, enlarged and dominant within their given habitats.”

Parer was inspired by the 1973 Czech/ French film Fantastic Planet (La Planète Sauvage). This stop motion science fiction film was directed by René Laloux and depicts a story set in an unimaginably distant future in a world of gargantuan humanoids where human beings are treated as animals and sometimes even kept as pets. The film was awarded the Grand Prix special jury prize at the 1973 Cannes Film Festival, and in 2016, it was ranked the 36th greatest animated movie ever by Rolling Stone.

In her eerie and surreal installation, Parer lightly touches on the idea of a struggling human race through her Fantastic Planet installation, opening the door for existential questions about our place in today’s world.

While wondrous and life-affirming, Parer’s work also offers jarring examinations into our world today. Fantastic Planet is a sight to behold, but also crackles with emotional and political resonance.

Fantastic Planet will be open daily from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., and is located at 735 S. Figueroa. The light installation is free and open to the public, and very close to the 7th Street Metro stop. Be sure to stop by, say hello, and welcome them to our City of Angels.

See more of Amanda Parer’s work at Parer Studio and watch a live one minute video of Fantastic Planet below.

—from http://thehollywoodhome.com/

 

While seemingly peaceful and ethereal, the figures are also imposing and daring. They seem to display an extraordinary curiosity for their onlookers, just as onlookers are fascinated by them. These giants from above give audiences the impression that they have just landed and are quietly observing us and gently exploring our, you guessed it, “fantastic planet.”

Mark Your Calendar: Stanley Kubrick

Mark Your Calendar: Stanley Kubrick

 

For those who know him as a filmmaker, Stanley Kubrick’s early career as a photojournalist is a revelation. In 1945, the future director of such classic works as 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and A Clockwork Orange (1971) was just a teenager—but one with an uncanny photographic sensibility, who was already scouting human-interest stories for Look magazine. Explore this formative phase in the career of one of the twentieth century’s most influential figures in cinematic history.

Stanley Kubrick (1928–1999) was seventeen when he sold his first photograph to the pictorial magazine Look in 1945. In his photographs, many unpublished, Kubrick trained the camera on his native city, drawing inspiration from the nightclubs, street scenes, and sporting events that made up his first assignments and capturing the pathos of ordinary life with a sophistication that belied his young age. He produced work that was far ahead of his time and focused on themes that would inspire him throughout his creative life. Indeed his photography laid the foundations for his cinematography: he learned through the camera’s lens to be an acute observer of human interactions and to tell stories through images in dynamic sequences.

Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs is organized by the Museum of the City of New York, drawn from its Look magazine archive, which explores this early and influential work from Kubrick’s formative years. The exhibition follows along as he developed his talent for storytelling and honed his visual style in Look assignments that offer a kaleidoscopic view of city life, from the gritty to the glamorous. In these images of celebrities and everyday people alike, Kubrick revealed the hundreds of human dramas unfolding at any moment.

Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs was organized by the Museum of the City of New York in collaboration with the SK Film Archives LLC.

For more information and tickets head here

THE SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER
The Skirball Cultural Center is an educational institution in Los Angeles, California devoted to sustaining Jewish heritage and American democratic ideals. It has been open to the public since 1996.
 
Address: 2701 N Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90049

Indian Summer

Indian Summer

I It’s a hazy shade of late summer— a color, vibrant yet subtle, smooth and alluring, as elegant as a cloud and closing the SoCal summer in style. The cultural relationship to pastels is most often connected with spring because of their association with Easter— pastels have created strong connections with other cultural movements throughout history, too. Pastels were initially known as a chalk-like medium for artists during the Renaissance. In the 17th and 18th centuries, pastel painting became a popular medium with the rise of the Baroque and Rococo styles. During this time, pastels became fashionable in dress because the same frivolity that was the popular taste in art was applied to clothing as well. Marie Antoinette had a proclivity for grand gowns done in pastel silks and laces. In the 20th century, pastels regained popularity during the Roaring Twenties, as flappers turned to the light tones as a response to the seriousness of World War I. Later on, pastels became the calling card of Miami architecture, as art-deco buildings throughout South Beach got a fresh coat of candy-colored paint, reviving the city. Pastels also made an impact on pop culture, with the iconic style of Sonny Crockett on Miami Vice and the art direction of Wes Anderson films, including The Grand Budapest Hotel. That was of course replaced by the chic and eternal, black. But as we all know, fashion comes and goes, so here we are at the backend of Summer looking at the neo-pastels for a summer style extravaganza. Photographed by up-and-coming photographer Christian Acosta, styled by Melissa Tejada, modeled by Danielle Fedder and make-up and hair by Caprice Mitchell. Photographed at the legendary Country Club Studio.

SHOP THE LOOK

RIAN

RIAN

Mini Choker Bag – Clear PVC (Vegan)

Choker Collar (2.5") – Clear PVC

Choker Collar (1.25") – Tan

Choker Cuff (2.5") – Clear PVC

Rita Corset Belt

THE CREW

Christian Acosta – Photographer – @Chrisdnlacosta
Danielle Fedder – Model [email protected]
Melissa Tejada – Stylist [email protected]_
Caprice Mitchell – MUA @primakeupartistry

Second Home comes to Hollywood

Second Home comes to Hollywood

The area of East Hollywood where the current Target is being built, very slowly, has a new neighbor. At night, driving by St. Andrews Place, one imagines a new mid-century modern hotel has moved in, what with the amber lighting and modern hanging lamps, its look like something that might be found in Palm Springs, not between Western Avenue and St. Andrews Place. It is so new that Google maps has not registered it. It opened last Monday, and it’s called Second Home. No, it is not for senior citizens, thought they are certainly welcome. Second Home is the newest “workspace” to slip into the vast SoCal terrain. Like Soho House, Neuehouse, Second Home caters to a sophisticated clientele in search of space, light, and working conditions that bring creative types together. Created by London-based co-founders and co-CEOs Sam Aldenton and Rohan Silva, Second Home is the new campus was designed by Madrid-based architecture firm Selgascano, with Downtown LA-based Omgivning acting as executive architect for the project. A lush landscape of light, 60 circular acrylic pods and foliage, it is simply, surprising that this somewhat off-beat neighborhood should house anything so glamourous. Second home hollywood will be home to 250 organizations and will feature: a branch of second home’s bookshop libreria, a 200-person auditorium, post-production facilities, a restaurant, outdoor terraces, and meeting and event spaces.

For memberships, a tour, information visit https://secondhome.io/hollywood

Address: 1370 N St Andrew’s Place, Los Angeles, CA 90028

 

AND ON THURSDAY, SPETEMBER 19TH

Antoni is the food and wine guru on Netflix’s Emmy Award-winning sensation Queer Eye, and his passion for food is completely irresistible. A television personality, chef, model, and now cookbook author, Antoni is a man of many talents and even more fascinating stories.

During this evening event, guests will get to meet Antoni and taste recipes from his new cookbook, Antoni in the Kitchen (published by HMH Books, on sale September 9).

Antoni in the Kitchen brings together Antoni’s trademark inclusive and accessible attitude to food with one hundred of his all-time favorite recipes.

This cookbook celebrates Antoni’s love for fresh, casual, and healthy cooking, and the occasional indulgent feast, and inspires both newbies and knowledgeable cooks to get back into the kitchen.

The ticket price includes a copy of the cookbook Antoni in the Kitchen and food inspired by his recipes.

FIDM 13th Television Costume Design Exhibit

FIDM 13th Television Costume Design Exhibit

The 13th Art of Television Costume Design exhibition is back this summer for another year of celebrating the artistry of costume designers and their teams. Television’s perpetual evolution through both network and digital platforms gives today’s designers even more opportunity to create bold, memorable characters for a variety of programming. This year’s exhibition will feature a diverse assortment of shows across several genres–science fiction fantasies, contemporary comedies, and historical dramas, to name a few–and as always will include Emmy® Award-nominated programs from the 2018-2019 television season. Look for fan favorites such as Game of Thrones, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, and Black-ish, plus discover the latest hits like The Masked Singer and Good Omens,

The exhibition is free to the public and will be held in the FIDM Museum at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising in downtown Los Angeles through Saturday, Oct. 26. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday.

For information, visit FIDMmuseum.org.

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