Love is the Air

Love is the Air

On Saturday, October 24 2020, the Los Angeles Center of Photography (LACP) will host its 5th annual Fundraising Gala. The event will take place in an exciting and immersive online environment hosted by award-winning actress Lisa Edelstein. LACP will honor Douglas Kirkland & Francoise Kirkland with the 2020 Stieglitz Award, as well as LA photographer Estevan Oriol, and the Los Angeles Times photographers. The evening will include special guests, a showcase of photographs from our juried competition, “The Connected World” and an online post-gala cocktail party.

Guests will also be invited to peruse a virtual gallery of over 100 extraordinary photographs from artists, galleries and institutions and can hear audio clips of artists talking about their work. Bidding to support LACP will be available around the world via Artsy from October 15th – October 29th  at

www.artsy.net/LACP

Notable artists include: Douglas Kirkland, Melanie Pullen, Ellen Von Unwerth, Andrew MacPherson, Art Streiber, Aline Smithson, Alix Malka, Andrew Macpherson, Baron Wolman, Bill Owens, Dana Gluckstein, David Burnett, David Hume Kennerly, David Carol, Elinor Carucci, Elizabeth Opalenik, Gerd Ludwig, Graham Nash, Gray Malin, Greg Gorman, Hank O’Neal, Herb Ritts, Jeff Bridges, Jill Enfield, Jim McHugh, Joel Sartore, Josephine Sacabo, Julia Dean, Kevin Scanlon, Lori Vrba, Lynn Goldsmith, Marjorie Salvaterra, Matthew Rolston, Michael Shulman, Michael Grecco, Mick Rock, Mitch Dobrowner, Norman Reedus, Randee St. Nicholas, Rania Matar, Ruth Orkin, Sam Abell, Sandro Miller, Stephen Wilkes, Sylvia Plachy just to name a few!   

Tickets available for purchase here: https://lacphoto.org/events/fifth-annual-fundraising-gala-2020/

ARTSY Benefit Auction photographs can be seen here: www.artsy.net/LACP

To learn more about LACP, please visit www.lacphoto.org. 

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Twitter @lacenterofphoto

Attached images by

Dennis Hopper by Douglas Kirkland

Grace Jones by Greg Gorman

Rascal in the 47 by Estevan Oriol

I’m Watching (Voyeur Series) by Melanie Pullen

Hollywood (Evan Rachel Wood) by Ellen Von Unwerth

Lost Angeles: The Photography of  Paul Jasmin

Lost Angeles: The Photography of Paul Jasmin

It is with great pleasure that the Fahey/Klein Gallery announces the new exhibition dates for Paul Jasmin: Lost Angeles, a selection of works celebrating Jasmin’s long career and the gallery’s first exhibition by the legendary Los Angeles photographer.

Paul Jasmin’s photographs are a dreamy tableau that takes the viewer on a journey of seductive beauty and erotic ennui. Lost Angeles highlights the last 50 years Jasmin has spent photographing L.A.’s young dreamers. Jasmin’s images eloquently mirror the mythology of the city in the vulnerability and intangible cool of his subjects. There is life in his portraits of smiling girls and strong and frail men – and the never fading love for the Los Angeles street scenes. There is a nostalgic myth of a splendid and ideal aesthetic, stopped and caught forever.

“Each one reminds me of a time in my life, a place or a person,” Jasmin explains. “The old and the new.”

Paul Jasmin has had a long career as a fashion and art photographer. He was born in Helena, Montana and in 1954 left to begin an incredible journey that would take him to Paris, Morocco, New York, and eventually “the city of dreams”, Los Angeles. Paul had been an illustrator, a painter, and an actor before picking up a camera – at the urging of his friend, Bruce Weber.

Jasmin’s images of real and imagined dreamers evoke a sensual and glamorous ideal while firmly rooted in reality. His Editorial work appears in Vogue, Teen Vogue, GQ, Details, V Magazine, V Man, Vogue Hommes, W, Nylon, Interview, Mr. Porter, APC, Ron Herman, Bergdorf Goodman, Saks, and Nordstrom. Paul Jasmin lives and works in Los Angeles where he teaches at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Paul Jasmin’s photography books include the much-acclaimed Hollywood Cowboy (2002) and its follow up, Lost Angeles (2004). In December 2010, Steidl/7l published Paul’s third book, California Dreaming.

September 24, 2020 through December 31, 2020

Opening Reception – *By Appointment Only*

Thursday, September 24, 2020, 10am – 5pm

Portfolio: Don Saban

Portfolio: Don Saban

Don Saban knows LA; he’s photographed it for a long time yielding images that are difficult to pin down in time. In fact, his eye for details found in Los Angeles create a visual proposition that they could be places found in Europe. His works has range—deep, black and white, to the new mundanity of color found in Uber scooters in a line. What is always apparent is his unfailing eye for the art of photography—his images rise above the ubiquituous cell phone portrayals and lead us in and back into a time when photography had meaning.

 
 
At what age and was there anything in particular that compelled you to pick up a camera and make it a career?
I was in grade school, and I can’t remember exactly what age I was, but very young… always the family photographer, so I guess that’s where it all started. I never really quit making photographs, and continued on with my first class in photography my junior year in high school, where I got very serious about it and made the decision that this is what I would do in life, and as time went on, nothing else captured my imagination or interest…so it was decided!
 It’s 2020—what is the state of photography in a digital world?
It just keeps getting better and better, and the printers as well. It has allowed me to do things I could only dream of back in the old film and darkroom days. That all seems so antiquated now, which in a certain sense, it is. With the advent of digital technology, it has inspired me immensely, and now allows me to do things I could never do before, so in a sense, the technology has finally caught up with my vision.
… on that note, what is your best method of advertising your work—instagram, twitter, etc?
I’m very active on Facebook and Instagram. I was posting a lot of my work on Flickr until it changed and is no longer unlimited for free accounts. I hit the limit for that a very long time ago, so I don’t really post there anymore. I also have websites of all the different bodies of work, which includes my video work, and can be seen here at the master site: http://donsaban.com/index.html
The Los Angeles project, how long have you been working on these images?
I think at least going on 20 years.

 

What photographers do you admire, living or dead that inspire you?
George Hoyningen-Huene, Horst P. Horst, Cecil Beaton, George Hurrell, and Vivian Maier to name a few…oh, there are so many, and I like them all for different reasons. I’m so glad you didn’t asked which is my favorite. How could I ever decide!
Is there a photographer that you mentor, and feel they are going places?
As you know, I’ve photographed a lot of jazz musicians over the years, and was introduced to a young lady who is just starting out by a mutual friend. I’ve sort have taken her under my wing and I’m passing along my knowledge of performance photography. She has a great eye, so I’m mostly helping with all the technical aspect of low light photography, and editing in Photoshop and Lightroom. She’s a very quick study, which makes it enjoyable to share what I know.

MEET THE PHOTOGRAPHER: DON SABAN

Don Saban, a native of Phoenix Arizona, received his formal training at the prestigious Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, and simultaneously was a private student and studied art and photography as protege of professor William A. Rohrback, University of California Santa Barbara, who was a student of Minor White at Berkeley in the early 50’s. Saban stayed on in Santa Barbara after finishing his studies and was a member of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art Photography Committee. During his tenure in Santa Barbara, he was one of the first photographers to be in Art Life magazine and was the first photographer to be on the cover.

After coming to Los Angeles, he taught at Otis/Parsons and continued his photographic work which was published in numerous magazines. After 10 years in Los Angeles, Saban accepted the position of Principal Photographer at the University of California Santa Barbara. During that period, he was commissioned by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art to go to Budapest and do the photographs for the book, Standing in the Tempest: Painters of the Hungarian Avant-Garde. Saban then returned to Los Angeles once again, and in 1999 was brought on board as photography consultant to work on the Tokyo DisneySea project. Saban found a new home with the Walt Disney Imagineers, and 21 years later, is still providing photographic expertise and working closely with the team on all their projects. Saban continues to exhibit his work, and has had many one man and group shows, has appeared in books, magazines and various publications, and is in private and public art collections both nationally and worldwide.

 

Mark Your Calendar: Stanley Kubrick

Mark Your Calendar: Stanley Kubrick

 

For those who know him as a filmmaker, Stanley Kubrick’s early career as a photojournalist is a revelation. In 1945, the future director of such classic works as 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) and A Clockwork Orange (1971) was just a teenager—but one with an uncanny photographic sensibility, who was already scouting human-interest stories for Look magazine. Explore this formative phase in the career of one of the twentieth century’s most influential figures in cinematic history.

Stanley Kubrick (1928–1999) was seventeen when he sold his first photograph to the pictorial magazine Look in 1945. In his photographs, many unpublished, Kubrick trained the camera on his native city, drawing inspiration from the nightclubs, street scenes, and sporting events that made up his first assignments and capturing the pathos of ordinary life with a sophistication that belied his young age. He produced work that was far ahead of his time and focused on themes that would inspire him throughout his creative life. Indeed his photography laid the foundations for his cinematography: he learned through the camera’s lens to be an acute observer of human interactions and to tell stories through images in dynamic sequences.

Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs is organized by the Museum of the City of New York, drawn from its Look magazine archive, which explores this early and influential work from Kubrick’s formative years. The exhibition follows along as he developed his talent for storytelling and honed his visual style in Look assignments that offer a kaleidoscopic view of city life, from the gritty to the glamorous. In these images of celebrities and everyday people alike, Kubrick revealed the hundreds of human dramas unfolding at any moment.

Through a Different Lens: Stanley Kubrick Photographs was organized by the Museum of the City of New York in collaboration with the SK Film Archives LLC.

For more information and tickets head here

THE SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER
The Skirball Cultural Center is an educational institution in Los Angeles, California devoted to sustaining Jewish heritage and American democratic ideals. It has been open to the public since 1996.
 
Address: 2701 N Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90049

Generation Z: A Photographic Series By Jennifer Blue

Generation Z: A Photographic Series By Jennifer Blue

AN INTERVIeW WITH Jennifer Blue

The world of Jennifer Blue is teeming with visual ideas—and with her new series, GEN Z, she captures in the most straight-forward manner, the faces of a generation. Her past investigations into image have produced a variety of subjects: Panoptics, Sentient, Hunger, Babe and Pugilists. Her work invariably dances around our notions of documentary, commercial work and art.

What does Gen Z mean to you and what is your relationship to it? I work in the library of a creative college. Recently, overnight, I observed a tsunami of new students wielding a completely different aesthetic and sensibility than their predecessors. Curious, I began to explore these individuals with conversation and camera. At this juncture I believe that Generation Z and myself mutually intrigue and inspire each other.

Shooting in film or digitally? I am shooting this series digitally, in the spirit of the digitally savvy Generation Z.

Is this an ongoing project and will you revisit some individuals as they pass from their Gen Z status? An interesting prospect. Most of my subjects have been captured very spontaneously. Too, the interaction with the subjects, for the most part have been a short-lived, impulsive splash. Yes, I would like to follow through with some of the subjects into the future.

Whose Photographic Work is inspiring you? Rineke Dijkstra

What is photography in the year 2019? I think that most viewers are hyperaware of being manipulated by advertising images. Fatigued with this manipulation, viewers are looking for genuine representations of the diversity of real life in 2019. Observe the increase in nonbinary, non-ageist, non-affluent imagery, due, I think, to the increased appetite for this type of media. 2019 is more of a celebration of documentary rather than commercial photography, in my opinion.

for more BLUE visit https://www.jenniferbluephotography.com/

HERBERT LIST: Young Men & Still Lifes

HERBERT LIST: Young Men & Still Lifes

 

 

 
The Fahey/Klein Gallery is pleased to present Young Men & Still Lifes by German photographer, Herbert List — The first exhibition of his legendary homoerotic male nudes in Los Angeles in over 25 years. List’s playful but austere, classically arranged compositions taken in Italy and Greece have become an indelible influence in modern and contemporary photography. Diary-like images of friends and still lives with found objects gave birth to a style that half a century later would influence fashion or lifestyle photography of masters like Bruce Weber or Herb Ritts.
 
Herbert List (1903 -1975) was born into a prosperous Hamburg merchant family and began an apprenticeship at a Heidelberg coffee dealer in 1921 while studying literature and art history at Heidelberg University. During travels for the coffee business between 1924-28, the young List began to take photographs, almost without any pretensions to art.
 
In 1930, though, his artistic leanings and connections to the European avant-garde brought him together with the American photographer Andreas Feininger, who introduced his new friend to the Rolleiflex, a more sophisticated camera that allowed a deliberate composition of images. Under the dual influence of the surrealist movement on the one hand, and of Bauhaus artists on the other, List photographed still life and his friends, developing his style. He has described his images as “composed visions where [my] arrangements try to capture the magical essence inhabiting and animating the world of appearances.”
 
After leaving Germany in 1936 in response to the danger of Nazi police attention to his openly gay lifestyle and his Jewish heritage, he turned his hobby into a profession. Working in Paris and London, he met George Hoyningen-Huene, who referred him to “Harper’s Bazaar”. Dissatisfied with the challenges of fashion photography and hired models, List instead focused on composing still lifes. The images produced there would later be compared to the paintings of Max Ernst and Giorgio de Chirico, and paved the way for List’s role as the most prominent photographer of the Fotografia Metafisica style.
 
Greece became List’s primary interest from 1937 to 1939. After his first visit to the antique temples, sculptures and landscapes, his first solo show opened in Paris in the summer of 1937. Publications in Life, Photographie, Verve and Harper’s Bazaar followed, and List began work on his first book, Licht über Hellas, which wasn’t published until 1953.
 
Working in Athens, List hoped to escape the war but was forced by invading troops to return to Germany in 1941. Because of his Jewish background, he was forbidden to publish or work officially in Germany. Several works, stored in a hotel in Paris, have been lost. In 1944 List was deployed by the German Wehrmacht to Norway where he served as a map archivist.
 
In 1951, List met Robert Capa, who convinced him to work as a contributor to Magnum. He turned his interest towards Italy from 1950 to 1961, photographing everything from street scenes to contemplative photo-essays, from architectural views to portraits of international artists living in Italy. He discovered the 35mm camera and the telephoto lens in 1953. His work became more spontaneous and was influenced by his Magnum colleague Henri Cartier-Bresson and the Italian Neo-Realism film movement.
 
Herbert List, Young Men & Still Lifes
June 27 through August 31, 2019
Opening Reception
May 27, 7 – 9pm
148 North La Brea Avenue
90036