She Rocks Awards – 2018

She Rocks Awards – 2018

        2018 SHE ROCKS AWARDS
        Friday, January 26, 2018
        The House of Blues Anaheim, Anaheim CA
        6:30pm – 10:00pm

2018 honorees (top row): Melissa Etheridge, The B-52’s Cindy Wilson and Kate Pierson, Exene Cervenka, Karla Redding-Andrews
(middle row): Vanessa Mering, Fanny: Patti Quatro Ericson, Jean Millington Adamian, Brie Howard Darling, June Millington and Alice de Buhr; Dawn Birr
(bottom row): Fabi Reyna, Amberly Crouse-Knox, Kristy Porter, Candace Stewart, and co-hosts Kat Corbett and Laura B. Whitmore

 

The Women’s International Music Network (the WiMN), proudly announces the 2018 She Rocks Awards honorees. Paying tribute to women in the music industry, the sixth annual She Rocks Awards at the NAMM Show will debut at its new home, the House of Blues Anaheim, on Friday, Jan. 26, 2018 at 6:30p.m. 

The 2018 She Rocks Awards recipients include:

  • Melissa Etheridge, Grammy® Award- and Academy® Award-winning artist
  • The B-52s Katie Pierson & Cindy Wilson, original members of one of the most beloved party rock bands of all time
  • Karla Redding-Andrews, Executive Director for The Otis Redding Foundation
  • Exene Cervenka, vocalist for the iconic punk band, X
  • Amberly Crouse-Knox, Senior Director of Creative and Business Development, BMG Production Music
  • Jean Millington AdamianJune MillingtonBrie Howard DarlingPatti Quatro Ericson and Alice de Buhr of the pioneering all-female American rock band, Fanny
  • Candace Stewart, Studio Manager, EastWest Studios in Hollywood
  • Dawn Birr, Channel Manager for the Americas, Sennheiser Business Solutions
  • Fabi Reyna, Founder and Editor of She Shreds Media
  • Vanessa Mering, Marketing Manager, HARMAN Professional
  • Kristy Porter, Guitar Center’s Director of Merchandising, General Accessories & Media

The event will be co-hosted by Kat Corbett, DJ on KROQ in Los Angeles, where she hosts the midday show and local music show, Locals Only, and host for Sirius XM. She’ll be joined by WiMN founder Laura B. Whitmore.

Gearing up for its sixth consecutive year, the She Rocks Awards pays tribute to women who display leadership and stand out within the music industry, and has become a standard at the NAMM Show. Previous award recipients include female industry leaders such as Colbie Caillat, Ronnie Spector, Sheila E, The Bangles, Shirley Manson, Esperanza Spalding, Chaka Khan, Jennifer Batten, Karmin, Orianthi, Dinah Gretsch, Craigie Zildjian, and more.

The She Rocks Awards brings together industry professionals, music icons, artists, fans and media to celebrate women in music. This high-energy evening includes live music, awards and speeches, celebrity appearances, a fabulous silent auction, food and beverages, giveaways, amazing gift bags and more!

104 Years Young – Reggie Gooch

104 Years Young – Reggie Gooch

Millie and Reggie – Casper, Wyoming 1942

At age 10, Reggie worked at a grocery store earning 50c per shift, except on Saturdays, when he worked from 7am-7pm and earned $1. This was during the economic decline as America headed towards the Great Depression, so Reggie loved his job because any extra produce was his to take home. He would share his food with his family of 7, plus all his neighbors.
At 15, he worked in a theater parking lot from 6:30PM -1AM and would do his homework on the job. “It didn’t bother me that I didn’t get enough sleep, because it allowed me to take my mother to England on a ship. I saved up for 3 years to do that.”
Indeed, by the time Reggie was 18 he had saved enough money to take his for 3 months to England via a cruise ship. That’s Reggie – a generous spirit.
Reggie tells me that he was married to Millie, and that they never had a fight, not once, in their 77 years together. Millie, who was four years older than Reggie, lived until 103 herself. Together they lived harmoniously in mutual respect and shared a deep love of adventure and travel. Talking about Millie and travel, Reggie’s eyes light up. These are the two things he loved most, and luckily, Millie loved traveling just as much as Reggie did. They traveled extensively, mainly on cargo boats, visiting almost every place on earth.
My favorite story was that at age 97, Millie looked at Reggie and said “there’s a Norwegian boat headed for Buenos Aires in 10 days from now. I think we should be on it.” And they were. They even extended their trip for a month long journey through South America. Reggie laughs, “People asked us, aren’t you worried about running around in those cities – and we said “Why should we worry?”
That’s what I love about this remarkable man: no squabbles with his wife, no reservations when traveling the world (literally and figuratively), no worries, no fears, and another thing, no medications. Reggie claims he has taken zero medications. He’s also never had an auto accident, and though he bought his first car in 1928, he quips that, “no insurance company has ever paid out on me in all those years. Plus, I never had to take any tests because I’d never had an accident.”
Reggie stopped driving at 100 of his own volition.
In keeping with his upbeat nature, as the interview was coming to a close, Reggie said “make sure you come to the lunch for my 105th birthday next year in June”.
You got it, Reggie. I wouldn’t miss it for the world.

What do you enjoy most in life? What is your favorite thing to do?
I love traveling. So did my wife. We went on numerous trips over the years, all over the world, but we never made a reservation in our life.

Where have you spent the bulk of your life?
I was born in Canada but moved to Los Angeles at the age of 2. I’ve lived in LA ever since then. That’s 102 years in LA – I love this place. I’ve also traveled all over the world, my favorite place being Bavaria, though I Italy too.

What are the biggest changes you’ve seen to Los Angeles?
East LA had an alligator farm and an ostrich farm. There were fun houses and roller coasters, and the Red Street Car. And the thing to do on a Saturday night was go to the movies. They had a huge movie theater with plush chairs that had a wraparound balcony that held 1500 people. This was five hours of entertainment that started with cartoons, the newsreel, a live performance, then intermission and after that, the feature movie. It was 25c to go in, but for 15c extra you could have nicer chairs.
I would save all week to go to the movies.
Plus, I’d walk up Laurel Canyon, except it was a dirt road, and at the top you could see the city, and in 1918, there were 3 properties – all big palace style homes. All the streets were named after the owners of properties. The biggest change is in land prices. After the depression in 1936, we bought 2 lots of land – each cost $350. We put $3.50 down and repaid $3.50 each month. We sold them for about 30k, but they are probably worth over a million now.

What are some of the places that you’ve traveled to?
Thailand, Burma, India, Egypt, Europe, Bali, Alaska, Singapore, Iran, South Africa, all over South America…I got stuck for 30 days in Kenya. I’ve lived on a house boat in Kashmir. I spent Christmas in the heart of Afghanistan. We bought a new car in South America then spent 9 months driving through Salvador, Honduras, Panama, Costa Rica. We shipped the car to Columbia and drove down through Peru, Chile doing the Pan American highway. And I loved going on the cargo ships. You can go explore while they unload their cargo, and they’re cheaper – especially the Polish ships, but you may be on a ship for 5 – 6 months.

You’ve lived through both World Wars, and the Great Depression. What was the scariest time for you?
On March 20th 1944, I was stationed in Pompeii as part of the air force, when Mount Vesuvius erupted. 138 aircraft were lost. We had to go to Corsica to get new airplanes, but sadly we lost them all as well.

Which was your favorite era?
They were all good. I traveled a great deal, and spent 8 years out of the country. I was drafted into service in 1942 and spent four years in the air force. I wrote to Millie almost every day for four years…and she wrote back. 

(At this point, Reggie brings out two boxes of beautifully preserved letters.
It’s really a touching moment.)

Did you know you were going to live a long time?
My mother lived until 83, but my dad died of heart problems at 55. I never thought about it. I used to be live one year at a time; now I play with one month at a time. (Reggie smiles his winning smile)

We want to know your secret. Do you eat healthy, exercise, smoke, drink?
I’ve never smoked, and hardly drink. I may have a glass of wine at dinner. My meals are perhaps a little beef or chicken, but mainly I eat masses of veggies and fruit. I took care of 142 avocado trees at Wattles, and I was on their board for 33 years. I love vegetables. I still go every Saturday morning to tend the garden, if I can.

If you could tell young people one thing, what would it be?
I’d say don’t worry about anything – life is too short to get in a fight or to argue

   

 LIVING LONGER

The proportion of people reaching 100 is growing over time – it was rare in the 1940s, but today, it doubles roughly every year.

The oldest person ever on record was Jeann Louise Calment who lived until 122.

The oldest known living person in the United States is Delphine Gibson, who is 114.

Oldest person to give birth: Omkari Panwar is the oldest mother in the world, gave birth to twins at age 70.

Country with most longevity: In Monaco people live to be nearly 90 years old (89.5, to be exact), which is four years longer than any other country and almost an entire decade longer than the average American. Monaco also happens to be one of the wealthiest countries in the world. Next on the list is Okinawa, Japan

Oldest driver on the roads: Fred Hale was issued with a driving license in 1995 at age 104, and drove until it expired on his 108th birthday in 1998.

At 98, Tao Porchon-Lynch, is the oldest yoga teacher in the world and Ernestine Shepherd at 81, is the oldest competitive female bodybuilder in the world.

Camp Roberts, Paso Robles – 1942

NIKI SMART |  managing editor

Niki Smart is a writer living in Los Angeles.  Her first memoir “Hell Camp” won her 2 x eLit Awards, an invitation to read at the LA Times Festival of Books, was a Top Ten Best Seller at local book stores, and garnered rave reviews from readers. Smart’s second memoir is set for release in early 2018. Smart is currently the Managing Editor for the SoCal Magazine (previously managing editor for the LA Fashion Magazine), and her writings have been published in More Magazine, Laguna Beach IndependentAspen Times, StuNewsThe LA Fashion Magazine, SoCal Magazine, and the Gemeindezeitung.

Ascencia – Lifting People out of Homelessness

Ascencia – Lifting People out of Homelessness

 

Ascencia is not only a safe haven for homeless individuals and families, but also a multi-service center that includes street outreach, employment services, substance abuse recovery assistance, benefits advocacy, has an onsite health clinic and offers psychiatric services, as well as an adjacent shelter. Plus, they have a transitional housing program and a permanent supportive housing program. Their mission is to lift people out of homelessness, one person, one family at a time.
Ascencia envisions a community where people in need can find services, resources, and safe, affordable housing.
Please support Ascencia in their efforts to help people find their way back from homelessness.

There are several ways you can help:
Ascencia welcomes donations – (please click on the link to see how and what to donate)
Or if you prefer you can volunteer – (please click on the link to see how to volunteer – tutoring, arts, cooking etc..)
Or support their fundraiser in January 2018 – A Royal Night   (Click on the pages below to enlarge).

 

Safe Screen

Safe Screen

Take Your Pick

Two lab results by the same doctor on the same day, reveal two completely different results.

           “Breast cancer should be the #1 issue for any woman.

             They should all be saying “enough of this bullshit”.”

By Niki Smart * Photographed by Jared Rubin

This is a personal story for me because I’ve suffered with dense, fibrocystic breasts since forever. I was 15 when I had my first scare due to severe lumps, resulting in a breast aspiration. My lumps have gone on and on, and I know that caffeine exacerbates lumps, ergo I’ve always been careful with my caffeine intake.
Be that as it may, I’ve had several more cysts aspirated; I’ve had lumps surgically removed; I’ve had 2 biopsies, and it’s just no fun whatsoever. Each time a new mass appears, I worry that I have cancer, and dread the procedure that I’m about to face. Since I’m quite small-framed and don’t have much breast tissue, mammograms are fairly painful (I believe they’re painful even if you have ample breast tissue). I’ve grown to loathe mammograms, not only because they’re painful but because they’re 100% guaranteed to be inconclusive for my breast type, which means an ultrasound will soon follow. That too, is usually inconclusive, and then the surgeon will start digging about in my breast – which is scary, painful and expensive on top of everything else.
To add to my confusion/frustration, I once received two different results (they arrived on the same day).from a mammogram done at Kaiser Permanente
One letter said – you are in the clear, no follow up needed.
The other said – you urgently need a biopsy.
Both letters were signed on the same day, by the same doctor. Not very reassuring is it?
Another thing of note was that every lump that required attention was always in my right breast. You’d think that would have been a clue for any doctor right? Apparently not.
Finally, after years of scares and strange lumps, the biggest mass of all showed up on my mammogram results.
“That’s a 50% chance of being cancer,” the department head nurse at Kaiser Permanente told me when I refused to have a “core” biopsy.
I was sick and tired of people cutting and digging into my breast and I just couldn’t bear to have another biopsy. Plus, I’ve heard that if you do have cancer, a biopsy can sometimes actually spread the cancer cells. Whether or not that’s true, I can’t say, but it certainly puts me off. So I went on a mission to find out what alternative non-invasive tests were out there to determine breast health.
I went for Thermography – an infrared heat reading that can pinpoint cancer. I went for Suretouch – similar to an ultrasound experience but it detects differences in hardness under the layers of soft tissue, and professes to be able to catch cancer 5 years ahead of a mammogram.
Both the Thermography and the Suretouch are painless and radiation free, but they couldn’t completely put my mind at ease. They both registered a large mass in my right breast, and both results said it didn’t seem likely to be cancer, but they couldn’t 100% guarantee this.
A friend told me about Dr. Kelly and his SonoCiné ultrasound – she didn’t just tell me about him, she sang his praises, so I made an appointment with Dr. Kelly.

Okay – so what is this technique? The SonoCiné is an automated whole breast ultrasound – a simple procedure similar to a regular ultrasound, but more thorough.
First of all, you have to wear a mesh vest – a proprietary camisole developed for the SonoCiné that fits like a sports bra. This helps to hold your breasts in place (which is especially helpful for women with larger breasts), and prevents the technologist from going over the same area twice. Next, you have a hydrogel nipple pad placed over your areola to flatten it, which prevents any shadows from causing a false reading. (Dr. Kelly has a patent on this nipple pad).
You lie on your back as your technician scans your upper areas with a hand held roller device capturing rows sequentially from below the collarbone to the lower margin of the breast. Then the SonoCiné machine relays the images to film.

Dr. Kelly stresses that it’s important to train the technologist to make enough images – 3mm apart at the most, so when watching the film, one can spot cancer small enough to stop it becoming a problem.
Once I was done being scanned, Dr. Kelly watched my film with me at his side. He pointed out everything he was
seeing, and assured me that my large mass was definitely NOT cancer. Well, I just wanted to kiss him for that alone, but then he asked me a question that no other health professional in 30+ years has ever asked me.
“What do you do on the right side of your body that is different form the left? Do you carry your handbag on your right shoulder?”
I had to think for a moment – then it came to me.
“I play guitar and the body of the guitar hits me exactly on my right breast.”
“That’s it” Dr. Kelly smiled. “The vibration from your guitar has altered the tissue in your right breast.”
He further explained that violin players can get this same tissue distortion in their necks from the vibration of their violins. Well, now I wanted to kiss and hug and squeeze Dr. Kelly, not only because he is adorable and the sweetest man, but because he had solved a life-long issue for me. Thank you a million times, Dr. Kelly.

INTERVIEW WITH DR. KELLY

I was so impressed with Dr. Kelly that I had to go back and interview the good doctor – because this man deserves attention – as do your breasts.

How long have you been in the “breast” business?
I’ve been a radiologist since 1975, and solely a breast radiologist since 1982. I realized that I could improve on the current ultrasound technology and by 1998 I’d come up with SonoCiné. Two years later (in 2000) I had a test run on 500 women. On one woman, the SonoCiné detected a cancer in each breast – her right and left – neither mammogram, nor ultrasound had picked up these cancers. This is when I knew I was definitely right – up until then my ideas had been theoretic.

Why is the SonoCiné better for dense breasts?
A mammogram stacks images and cancer is like a bear in the forest – fatty, or dense breasts have many leaves – meaning, mammograms aren’t great for dense breasts. Plus a mammogram has the extra risk of radiation and SonoCiné avoids the radiation. The SonoCiné can catch cancer at 10mm or less. 40-50% of cancers are felt before they are seen on a mammogram. By this time their size is 17mm-25mm.

Can you tell me more about your text and drive theory?
The human brain can’t successfully text and drive at the same time. You may think you can, but your brain physically can’t focus completely on both tasks at the same time – they require the same part of the brain to do. Same thing with a regular ultrasound. The technician is reading the monitor at the same time as focusing on sliding the roller across your chest. If you separate the two actions, there is less room for error and if you improve the gathering of information by having the images closer together – then the readings will be easier. With the SonoCiné reading, you give the film your entire attention in a distraction-free environment. This method of review has been shown to increase the detection of cancers as small as 5mm – 10mm in size.

What about MRIs as a way to screen for cancer of the breast?
People may think an MRI is the way to be sure – but MRI injects heavy metal into your system. In a tight spot, an MRI is okay, but you can’t use it once a year as a screening procedure. That would be reckless as the gadolinium stays with you and ends up in brain and your bones.

How many SonoCiné machines are there?
There are now 50 SonoCiné machines worldwide.

How many women do you see in a month on average?
About 100.

Do you think there are a lot of unnecessary biopsies/removals?
Ultrasound is more definitive – but understanding is variable in this country.
In UK, Europe and Canada – they are better at understanding the images.

What do you recommend for women at this point?
Do both – in the interim.

Do you think we keep doing mammograms because it’s cheaper for the medical field? Insurance companies? Is it expensive to replace the machinery?
Oh yes. This is a game changer. Disruptive technology means someone loses.

Talking of money, where do you get your funding?
The Bank of Kelly. I’ve put everything into this. I’ve even mortgaged my house, which didn’t make my wife too happy, I can tell you. But I know that about 3000 women die every month from breast cancer in America alone. The rate is higher in China, with 1 woman per minute. There are approximately 190,000 new cases of breast cancer annually. And about 40,610 women in the U.S. are expected to die in 2017 from breast cancer. Breast cancer should be the #1 issue for any woman. They should all be saying “enough of this bullshit”.

Here at SoCal magazine, we couldn’t agree more.

For more information on Dr. Kelly’s SoneCine click here

 

Other Screenings without Radiation
SureTouch: The SureTouch Breast Exam is painless, radiation free and delivers immediate results. Breasts are examined quickly and comfortably without compression. The patented, hand-held, SureTouch sensor glides easily over the entire breast and underarm area and detects differences in hardness under the layers of soft tissue. Its 192 sensing elements capture and document the shape, location, size and hardness of breast lesions.  Any breast lesions are displayed on the SureTouch console screen in multi-dimensional full-color images. Because images are digitally stored for future reference, results can be tracked and compared for changes over time. http://suretouch.us

Thermography:
Digital Infrared Imaging detects the heat produced by increased blood vessel circulation and metabolic changes associated with a tumor’s genesis and growth. A thermography session can detect thermal signs that may suggest a pre-cancerous state of the breast, or signs of cancer at an extremely early stage. However, Digital Infrared Imaging does not have the ability to detect 100% of all cancers. Consequently, Digital Infrared Imaging’s role is in addition (to mammography and physical examination, not in lieu of. www.breastthermography.com

 

NAKED IN ALASKA

NAKED IN ALASKA

The Los Angeles Premiere of “NAKED IN ALASKA” opens at BOOTLEG Theater’s SOLO QUEENS FEST Saturday, October 28, at 7:30 P.M.
Valerie Hager’s Award-Winning Show – (Plays through November 19)
Directed by Scott Wesley Slavin

After three sold-out, award-winning runs in international Fringe Festivals (New York City, Edinburgh, and Chicago), Valerie Hager’s autobiographical solo play about her years stripping in the Alaskan frontier will open at Bootleg Theater on Saturday, October 28.

The recipient of the 2013 Award for Outstanding Solo Performance from the New York City International Fringe Festival, 2013 Audience Favorite Award from the Chicago Fringe Festival, 2014 Pick of the Fest Award from Edinburgh’s The New Current Magazine, and Time Out New York’s four-star Critic’s Pick and Recommended Show, “Naked In Alaska” is a visceral, fire-hot experience not-to-be-missed.

Valerie Hager is a former exotic dancer and award-winning writer-performer. She’s also a movement artist, a teacher, and founder of SOLOfire Workshops through which she teaches movement-based story-creation to individuals and groups across the U.S.

Bootleg Theater, named by Time Out as one of Los Angeles’ “best performing arts centers,” is a year-round, inclusive art space for original, boundary-defying live theater, music, and dance performances. Bootleg Theater is proud to present its first-ever SOLO QUEENS FEST, featuring solo performances by local female artists. Bootleg has a fierce belief in the power of women in Art to create change in the world, and this festival will celebrate women and their life experiences.

For ticket info click here (showtimes vary). Tickets are $15 Stud/Sen, $20 GA, and group discounts are available.
Tickets for Valerie’s solo technique workshop “SOLOfire – a Writing and Movement Workshop”  – are $30.

Bootleg Theater is located at 2220 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90057
Street parking and a free lot is available at the church across the street at the intersection of Beverly and Roselake.

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