PAIR Eyewear Lights Up Inspiring Kids Eyewear

PAIR Eyewear Lights Up Inspiring Kids Eyewear

Do you ever wish you could turn back the clock and experience the modern world as a kid? Unfortunately, we don’t have anything to help make that come true. However, we’re happy to introduce PAIR Eyewear – the customizable, high quality, affordable and fun glasses your kids deserve! Now, we know you can relate when it comes to looking back at the limitations that existed for children’s glasses back in the day.

Founded by two life-long glasses wearers, and catching notoriety on Shark Tank (spoiler alert: they got a deal!), PAIR addresses the top two issues facing youngsters in need of their first set: affordability and confidence. With a mix and match approach, the prescription base frames start at just $60, and interchangeable toppers (including sunglass selections) start at $25 each. With PAIR, not only are kids part of designing something just for them, they can feel good about sporting their new spectacular spectacles! Change for the season, an upcoming event or vacation, or just for fun – PAIR delivers unmatched versatility for children up to 14 years old, while also being a wallet-friendly solution for parents. Just in time for summer, PAIR just launched  a new star-spangled Fourth of July collection – Red, White and You — as well as a glitter-clad Sparkle Collection!

Because PAIR believes that every child deserves attention to eyehealth – for every PAIR purchased one will be donated to children in the developing world, through their partnership with The Eyelliance.

Words From Sophia Edelstein, Co-CEO and Co-Founder of PAIR Eyewear

Why kids? 

“Before PAIR, no one had ever sat down and asked kids what they wanted in a pair of glasses. After interviewing over 500 families, we kept hearing from kids that their glasses didn’t feel like an extension of their personality. Nathan, one of our co-founders had the exact same experience as a child wearing glasses and hated the lack of choices available and the inability to change them as your favorite color or style changed.

 

We started PAIR to solve this problem and create the first glasses company designed from the ground up, for children and parents. PAIR gives kids the ability of choice and unlocks self-expression, which makes them want to wear their glasses more!”

 

Starting The Business 

“We started PAIR from our college dorm rooms. We spent our senior year interviewing as many families as possible, to find all of the pain points associated with the glasses buying experience for children. Together, with the former head of product from Warby Parker, we designed the perfect PAIR of glasses for kids that’s customizable but also affordable for parents! We created a buying process that’s so easy and simple that a mom can buy glasses for her kids while relaxing on the couch watching tv.”

A STEP BEYOND: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful

A STEP BEYOND: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful

The Los Angeles art world, like the broader society, is struggling with how to continue to operate during the Covid-19 Pandemic. Art galleries and museums all over the Southland have shuttered their doors and installations have languished in darkened rooms, without visitors. Interesting solutions have emerged to tackle this difficult challenge. One solution is to create fully digital visiting tools, which enables show-goers to visit an art space from the comfort and safety of their home.
A fabulous 2020 design show entitled “A STEP BEYOND: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful” has recently graced the galleries at the venerable Otis College of Art and Design. While the gallery doors for A STEP BEYOND were prematurely closed to the public in mid-March, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, show curator Lauria and gallery staff pivoted quickly and were able to digitize the show experience. The OTIS team has created an online tour of the show including a virtual curator tour, which is coming soon.
Otis is a private college, founded in 1918, which was the first independent professional school of art established in Los Angeles. The Ben Maltz Gallery on campus features a full slate of art and design shows throughout the calendar year. Guest curator, Jo Lauria has created a knock-out show for the space. On the Ben Maltz gallery site, there is now a 60-image slide show complete with didactic information. While nothing can replace the visceral experience of seeing a beautifully designed art show in person, during the time of social distancing this is certainly a healthy and welcome option. The full show can be accessed at:  https://www.otis.edu/ben-maltz-gallery/step-beyond-contemporary-footwear-functional-to-fanciful

“At the beginning of the War we were limited to the prescribed boot for walking…now our choice of shoes has become more unlimited than ever, and the subject of footwear fascinating enough to talk about at length.”– Vogue Magazine, 1918

Humans have an intimate relationship with shoes. In the time of pre-history, our ancestors utilized woven grasses and animal hide to wrap the foot for needed warmth and protection. Fast forward to our modern age, and footwear – even our perception of it – has changed radically. We now universally obsess over the design, concept and look of the shoes we wear and collect. For some, shoes are the ultimate status symbol.

 

 

A STEP BEYOND show, Otis Alumni shoes, L-R: Anna Miller (above), Alexandria Felix and Jacob Kim (below)

Historical shoes on display representing decades from 1900 through 2010, “A Step Beyond”

Rem D. Koolhas, “Mobius” shoe progression for United Nude, 2003-2016. UNITED NUDE, a global lifestyle brand co-founded by Rem D. Koolhaas, combines fashion, architecture, and design to produce footwear with an “alternative attitude.”

Situated at the intersection of art and design, A STEP BEYOND explores the complex relationship between fashion, footwear, society and culture – focusing on the past 110 years. The exhibition features contemporary footwear from a variety of perspectives, including custom shoes designed and handcrafted for a private client; luxury, limited-edition creations made for a privileged clientele; and shoes mass-produced for the consumer market.

“Footwear reflects the imagination, innovation, and artistry of its time.”– Jo Lauria, curator

A STEP BEYOND also includes footwear related artworks and showcases the imagination and technical prowess invested in human foot covering. The show features five shoe collections, (including twenty-one collectible sneakers), and eighty-five historical shoes, dating from 1900 through 2010. Twenty-three international artists, craftsmen and architects are represented including luminaries such as Andy Warhol, Rem D. Koolhaas and Zaha Hadid.

Zaha Hadid “NOVA” shoe for United Nude

Paul Kaufman for pskaufman shoes. Kaufman, has worked for international companies Dr. Martens, Na Na, Fornarina, Rocket Dog, Twin Star, and London Underground.

 The enduring allure of the Cowboy boot, A Step Beyond

The show is smartly divided into seven distinctive categories, outlined by the curator as follows:

The shoe as functional footwear – encompassing custom designed and handcrafted shoes for private clients, luxury, limited-edition creations for privileged clientele, and mass-produced shoes for the consumer market

The shoe as structure, sculpture and performance gear: highlighting artists/designers who successfully merge functionality with freedom of expression and the extend the shoe into other artistic realms.

The shoe as fashion marker: charting fashion trends and key developments in 20th and 21st century design.

The shoe as composition: focusing on the illustrated shoe as fashion’s most important accessory.

The shoe beyond literal object: Featuring the shoe as protagonist in individual artistic narratives.

The shoe as collectible: centering on the phenomenon of shoe collectors and their collections.

The shoe as design challenge: Otis alumni and faculty rise to the challenge of creating footwear with flair.

By separating the exhibit into these distinct categories, the viewer is encouraged to think about the shoe not only in its historical context, but to see it as a practical object and an art/luxury object. The various ways artists and designers think about, and approach the shoe, is the focus.

Ill-fitting or supportive, teetering or flat, silent or squeaky, restrictive or ergonomic, the forms surrounding our feet ask us to weigh nature against desire, and the outcome of this equation, when tipped even slightly toward one side or another, has the ability to impact every inch of our bodies and our understanding of ourselves.” – Amara Hark-Weber, bespoke shoemaker

Highlighting the artists who have participated in the exhibit, it was indeed tempting to try to cover every maker in the show, as they all have fascinating stories and create beautiful work. I’ve chosen a handful of contributors to highlight whom I feel capture the spirit of the exhibit.

 

The shoe as collectible, A STEP BEYOND, featuring a selection from the sneaker collection of Twin Daniel, and high-fashion shoes from the collections of Jean Concoff and Pamela Weir-Quiton.

Elisabeth Thorsen wearing her handcrafted leather Rose Maling shoes embellished with fresh water pearls, antique beads and gold thread, with hand-carved wood soles and heels, 2013; and on dinner plate is her handmade shoe Tsar Saltan, embossed leather, hand-carved wood soles and heels, 2013.

Elisabeth Thorsen, L-R: Easy Ticket to Hoppa-Hage, 2017, marbleized vegetable leather-chalk heels; Polka, 2018, Goodyear welted shoes, vegetable leather , hand-painted and hand-stitched details, in collaboration with Mari Jaeger, designer and Paint Me a Birdie (shoes), 2015, embroidery and EVA materials, in collaboration with Jens Stegger Ledaal; and Print from Print Me a Birdie shoes, 2015, ink on paper.

Elisabeth Thorsen is a Norwegian shoemaker and performance artist who draws inspiration from “nature, art, fairytales and 1970’s movies.”  Thorsen graduated from the Norwegian school for shoemaking in 2008 and has been making art using shoes as her primary focus ever since. Thorsen views her work as pieces of art, not merely functional objects. Her performances are both live and captured in digital video. She prefers to craft her shoes with experimental, non-traditional materials such as “carpets, furniture, carved sculptural elements, drapes and even ice, sugar, pencils and sports tape.” (1: From Artist Bio, Elisabeth Thorsen)

In Gaza Bowen’s series, Shoes for the Little Woman, the shoes are fabricated mostly from cleaning products that serve as a parody for the stereotype of the happy housewife who “enjoys” housework.  Gaza first learned her craft in 1976 at Colonial Williamsburg from a master cobbler. Gaza dedicated nearly twenty years to honing her construction skills and representing the shoe’s “cultural meaning and social significance” in both functional footwear and sculptural applications. 

“The works on display provide a focused look into the extraordinary life of Gaza Bowen. If anyone can claim the territory of “progenitor of sculptural shoes,” it is Gaza: she originated the concept of ‘narrative’ footwear that combines humor, unusual materials, invention, attitude, and social commentary.” – Jo Lauria, curator

Gaza, who passed away in 2005, noted “there’s more (to the shoes) for the person that cares to look. In that humor, I’m trying to make a statement about women and fashion, and women and household cleaning, and women as sex symbols.”

 

Helen Chung is an LA artist who works in multiple medium including installation, painting and photography. Drawing on popular culture, literature, and her former experience in accessory design, the artist attempts to “debunk social and cultural myths surrounding the notions of possession, desire, objectification, commodity, and commerce.”   “The two bodies of work on exhibit,” adds the artist, “are displayed in a boutique style with shoes and bags, except the items displayed are only containers of such objects. The boxes and the deconstructed shopping bags engage in a dialogue between intuition and intention, outlining two different processes: one planned with specific outcome, the other, a spontaneous process allowing whim and chance. The work ironically challenges the fixed notion of containers, as merely an external protection or subordinate transporting aid, not quite qualifying as an entity in itself.”  By focusing on the container, and the concept of containment, curator Jo Lauria notes “Helen maintains the integrity of the shoebox and the shopping bag by not adding anything or taking anything away.”

Bespoke shoemaker, Amara Hark-Weber considers the shoe “an extension of body, vehicle, representation of personal identity, inhibitor to/enhancer of movement, metaphor, fetish form, or simply utilitarian object.” Through sculptural footwear, Hark-Weber seeks to question our ideas of function and what we are willing to subject our bodies to. 

‘My sculptural footwear is an exploration of human movement, building techniques, and visual metaphor. They are objects that come alive with personal narrative when worn, with the power to challenge the viewer’s ideas about form, function, body, and movement.”– Amara Hark-Weber

 

Elisabeth Thorsen, Shizaru (4th Monkey Boot), 2018, leather, hand-carved wood heels. Carving by Trude Johansen, detail.

Gaza Bowen, “Little Woman AM” shoes, 1995, leather, rubber foam, linoleum, plastic bottles, dish scrubbers.

Gaza Bowen, Shoes for the Angry Little Woman, 1990, knives, potato peelers, rhinestones, skewers, scouring pads, kidskin, wood, paint, embroidered cloth, rose twigs, nail polish.

 

Helen Chung, Shoe Boxes and Shopping Bags

Amara Hark-Weber, shoe designer-maker in her studio.

Amara Hark-Weber, L-R: Muscle Memory: Equilibrium, 2013, cork, kidskin, thread; Muscle Memory: Opposition, 2013, kidskin, thread, hardware; Muscle Memory: Regrounding, 2013, basswood, kidskin.

“Andy Warhol glorified the shoe by using it as the sole seductive element of his still-life drawings, devoting entire portfolios to illustrations of women’s footwear.” – Jo Lauria, curator

The show also features artists who use images of shoes in their work. Spirited pen and ink drawings of shoes by Andy Warhol are included. According to the exhibition didactic, Andy Warhol began his career as a commercial artist in New York City in the 1940s and self-published hand-colored prints of his campy and glamorous shoes. 

“Widely distributed in fashion magazines such as Glamour and Vogue, Warhol’s illustrations elevated the pump to an object of desire.”  – Jo Lauria, curator 

Joshua Wong’s artwork of glamorous shoes, reflects his life-long love of footwear as luxury item. Inspired by the Upper East Side ladies of Manhattan hailing cabs in their 4-inch heels, Wong launched a successful career designing women’s footwear and handbags. Wong’s love for fashion illustration began in childhood when he was four years old, when his parents noticed that he was drawing high-heeled shoes and racing cars. He later mastered these skills at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. 

After a career in advertising Ralph Lauren hired Joshua to be his women’s collection footwear designer. There, he was involved in “the fast-paced world of runway shows and super models.” While traveling to Paris, Milan and London, Joshua was inspired to capture even more stories of fashion and design. Later on, he became the vice president of footwear design at Banana Republic.  Joshua currently enjoys developing the next generation of designers as a mentor at various schools and is an official mentor at his alma mater, Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. (2: From Artist Bio, Joshua Wong)

Amara Hark-Weber – Measurements, a work in progress

Andy Warhol, reproductions of original ink and pen drawings of shoes. Courtesy of Sotheby’s photography.

Joshua Wong, “Snake Shoe” ink and pen drawing on paper

Gregory Weir-Quiton is a legendary fashion illustrator who can usually be seen at Los Angeles art events, sitting in the middle of the crowd, drawing from life. 

“My passion is drawing the contemporary figure. Fashion design obviously influences my work since what intrigues me is how people design themselves (and everyone does). The drawing is an end in itself and I rarely add anything once the pose is over.” – Gregory Weir-Quiton

As a young person Weir-Quiton saw a fashion illustration in the local Detroit newspaper, and he knew he had found his calling. He graduated from Cass Tech High School, majoring in fashion illustration and then received a scholarship to Art Students League. He worked in New York and Chicago before moving to Los Angeles. In Los Angeles, he met and married his wife Pamela Weir-Quiton a celebrated wood worker. Her fantastic collection of shoe wear is featured in the exhibit. For 35 years, Gregory worked with major California retailers in the fashion industry including, THE MAY COMPANY, ROBINSONS, BULLOCKS, THE BROADWAY and I. MAGNIN. In this role, Gregory honed his skills of drawing shoes for advertisements. He would later refine these skills to create his more personal fashion illustrations of the human figure, accessorized.  After a long career in fashion illustration, Gregory reinvented himself at Hollywood advertising agency, BLT & Associates, where he works on major film and television releases. Gregory’s original concept sketch, drawn on a napkin for Stephen Spielberg, eventually became the iconic DREAMWORKS logo of the boy fishing on the crescent moon.

 

Gregory Weir-Quiton, ink and pen drawing

Gregory Weir-Quiton, pencil drawings on paper, for Bullocks Wilshire.

Gregory Weir-Quiton, Pencil on paper drawing for Bullocks Wilshire.

Through painting and object making, Alex Becerra pays homage to the lowly footwear traditionally worn in rural settings by Mexican laborers or in urban environments as “Gang-style Street wear” when the sandals are worn with white tube socks. The painting and object combination of huaraches references the artist’s Mexican-American heritage. The artist constructed traditional Mexican huaraches out of sheets of dried acrylic paint that were cut and woven by hand, to mimic the authentic leather sandals. Becerra’s engaging oil paintings are placed on the wall behind his real-life shoe subjects for maximum effect.

Phyllis Green is a Los Angeles artist, educator and curator who is interested in “integrating gender politics and craft.” Primarily a sculptor, she also works in performance, installation and video. Her contribution to the show is a soft sculpture, a lotus flower shape, crafted from sheepskin and topped with sheepskin slippers. Born in Minneapolis, Green grew up in Winnipeg Canada and attended the University of Manitoba. In 1978 she moved to Los Angeles and earned an MFA from UCLA in 1981. Green has lectured globally and has held various teaching positions at UCLA, USC at Loyola Marymount University. (3: From Artist Bio and Wikipedia, Phyllis Green)

Green’s “formally beautiful body of work somehow engages art history, contemporary social and political issues and heartfelt mystical spirituality without missing a beat” – Doug Harvey

 

Alex Becerra, L-R: NIKE Waffle Racer, 2019, oil on linen. Actual NIKE Waffle Racer shoes displayed on shelf below. Self Portrait with Huaraches, 2019, oil on canvas. Huaraches, 2013, hand-woven acrylic paint, displayed on shelf below.

Artist Phyllis Green, with her sculpture “Stepping on a Lotus”

A Step Beyond: Contemporary Footwear, Functional to Fanciful curated by Jo Lauria now showing virtually at the Ben Maltz Gallery, OTIS.

Katie Nartonis is a 20th century design specialist, curator and filmmaker with over 20 years experience in the auction field. She is passionate about the work of the post-war California studio artists and craftsmen. She is currently co-authoring a book on the San Diego maker Jack Roger Hopkins. More info at at www.thenartonisproject.com.
Cubcoats Takes Part in Amazon’s BIG STYLE Sale!

Cubcoats Takes Part in Amazon’s BIG STYLE Sale!

If you’re on the lookout for special deals for kiddos, Cubcoats has you covered!
Now part of Amazon’s BIG STYLE SALE, and for a limited time only — you can snag select styles and masks from
Cubcoats for up to 50% off! The sale is already underway, and ends on 6/28. Sure, it may be summer, but it doesn’t hurt to secure an early holiday or birthday present!
Featuring characters from beloved collaborations with Paw Patrol, Star Wars, Disney, Marvel and more – these cute and cuddly transforming zip-ups have never been more accessible. Still in need of a mask for your little one? Cubcoats’ kid-friendly reusable masks are also included in the sale; a solution for making this ‘new normal’ easier than ever for reluctant cubs. Previously a #1 seller on Amazon Prime Day, select styles start at $25, and will be on sale through 6/28. Parent and kid approved, Cubcoats has options for every child looking to take playtime adventures to the next level.
 
 
Cubcoats Launches New Kid-Friendly Line of Masks

Cubcoats Launches New Kid-Friendly Line of Masks

Los Angeles, CA (May 27, 2020)Cubcoats, the popular children’s 2-in-1 stuffed animal, turned cozy hoodie company understands that this time can be especially scary for kids as they notice changes in their daily lives — most noticeably, the addition of medical masks to the faces of friends, family and neighbors.

To help little ones adjust to the ‘new-normal,’ Cubcoats has launched a line of ‘kid-friendly’ masks in playful designs mimicking the characters kids have come to know and love: Kali the Kitty, Uki the Unicorn, Papo the Panda and Pimm the Puppy.

Masks are currently available now for $12.99/2-pack, and began shipping on May 11th. With masks mandated in multiple states across the country for children ages 2+ this is a welcome option to introduce the safety measure to children. Each is made from reusable, non-medical, high-quality cotton with a removable PM2.5 carbon filter. 

As part of Cubcoats’ everyday mission to support children everywhere, 10% of sales will be donated to Feeding America in support of COVID-19 relief efforts. So far, Cubcoats has been able to provide over 65,000 meals!!

Mask Details

  • 6.6” x 4.7” (not including the earloop)
  • Made of 2 layers of 100% Cotton. 
  • A shapeable metal nose piece ensures a comfortable and secure fit
  • Masks are reusable and can be safely machine washed and dried.
  • Recommended for kids ages 5 and up. Not a direct substitute for FDA-approved N95, surgical, or procedural masks.

Winter Style

Winter Style

The Art Of Winter Outerwear In A Warmer Climate

SoCal has its own style
These days, people in Southern California are more accustomed than ever to warm winters. Anything much below the low 50s or high 40s is an aberration, and while some LA folks may shiver in 65-degree weather, this still makes for a more comfortable winter than most experience. The interesting thing is squaring this unusually mild season with one of the more fashion-forward and culturally up-to-date regions in the United States. While fashionistas around the world rush to update winter wardrobes with the latest faux-fur coats and sustainably-sourced infinity scarves, you might be sitting outside at a restaurant in a long-sleeved tee! This doesn’t mean winter outerwear isn’t an option in warmer climates though. There’s just a little bit of an art to it. To examine the idea further, for any readers in SoCal, other stylish spots like Austin or Miami, or anywhere else where the winters are warm, we dug into some specific suggestions for seasonal garments. Find A Statement Sleeveless Coat It’s sometimes remarkable in fashion in general how far you can get by thinking just a little bit outside the box. This is certainly true when you’re looking for ways to embrace fall and winter fashions living in a region that doesn’t really get a winter by traditional standards. We actually went back a number of years and found an article on this very topic – winter fashion in warmer climates – that presented some lovely ideas that can still inspire you today. Most notably, a sleeveless camel coat highlighted by Song Of Style stuck out. It’s undeniably, timelessly chic, can be worn with any number of ensembles (the example included a leopard-print skirt underneath), and perfectly suits a warmer winter climate. Lightweight Jackets Are Your Friends A lightweight jacket can be the perfect everyday garment for a mild winter, though it’s sometimes surprisingly hard to find the right one. Often you end up caught between ordinary hoodies and sweatshirts, and heavier coats or down jackets that are warmer than you need. For the current season, the zip-front lightweight twill hooded jacket from Woman Within serves as the perfect picture of an in-between option. It’s described as something to have on hand for “transitional weather” when it’s neither too hot nor too cold, and the brand’s inclusive sizing range can also be a bonus. Something with a little room can be cool and casual for a SoCal winter, and at the same time this jacket will still fit you if you add a few pounds over the season (as so many of us tend to do!). Embrace A Playful Sweatshirt Or Two Since you likely aren’t going to be bulking up with full-fledged winter outerwear, there’s nothing wrong with taking an altogether more casual approach also. This likely won’t be an everyday option like a lightweight jacket might be, but if you find a graphic sweatshirt that speaks to something you love – perhaps a retro sports team look, or one of the Nickelodeon sweatshirts from Love Tribe – it can be just the thing for an average winter day among friends. These basic sweatshirts don’t heat you up too much, and almost always look great with the sleeves pushed up, but will still give you that little bit of added warmth you need. Opt For A Fall Blazer One of the trickiest things about all of this is finding an everyday look if you’re a little bit more fashion-forward. The sleeveless coat option is a very nice look, but not necessarily something for every day of the week; a lightweight jacket can be perfectly stylish, but may not fit in, say, a work environment. And needless to say, a Rugrats sweatshirt has its place! There’s a clear solution here though, and it’s to find a stylish fall blazer or two that can take you right through a mild winter season. A standard black or charcoal option can be dressed up or down and make for an excellent everyday jacket substitute. Though we also can’t help but love the emerald-colored notch collar cotton blend blazer from Gibson that’s popping up in some 2019 collections and write-ups. Find A Cap Or Beret You Love It’s somewhat difficult to take winter fashion beyond light jackets and coats when you live in a warmer area; it’s not as if you’re going to need some cute mittens or a head scarf for the next 55-degree day! That said, a seasonally appropriate alternative to a winter cap or beanie can be a nice touch that works just fine in warmer temperatures. Such an accessory can take all sorts of forms. You might actually find a loosely knit beanie that’s more of a fashion statement than a means of keeping your head warm. If you want to be a little bolder, you might find a suede fedora to pair with certain looks. For some winter staples though, the textured knit “baker boy” cap from Brixton and Hat Attack’s leopard-print beret were a few options that caught our eye. You can go well beyond these suggestions to more fully dive into winter fashion in a warmer region. A light scarf, some classic boots, whatever colors are trending in a given year…. These are all wonderful ways to embrace the season regardless of temperature. But the ideas and suggestions above can help you to really enjoy the seasonal wardrobe update you might be yearning for.

Cozy Cubcoats Stampede into Los Angeles with Amazon Popup

Cozy Cubcoats Stampede into Los Angeles with Amazon Popup

What’s cute, cozy and taking over Los Angeles? Cubcoats! From online to IRL, the 2-in-1 stuffed animal turned cozy hoodie will be available in-store from November 1st through January 5th at the Del Amo Fashion  Center in Torrance, CA.

 
As the #1 Best Selling Toy (and kid’s fashion statement!) on Amazon Prime Day, Amazon has partnered with Cubcoats to create this magical experience for families and kids. Ranking #1 Most Wished for on Amazon, customers have shared how Cubcoats have been a source of comfort, imagination, and empowerment for their kids. “We want to put that feeling front and center. Cubcoats partnership with Amazon & Simon Properties is the first time we’ll be able to bring this unique world to life,” states Cubcoats CMO & Co-Founder Zac Park and Cubcoats VP of Design & Creative, Mimi Chao.  
 
Let your child’s adventure unfold at the Amazon pop-up with exclusive Cubcoats characters including Hello Kitty, Winnie the Pooh and Frozen. The space emphasizes the magic of Cubcoats with fun photo opportunities, interactive adventures and special programming. Cubcoats x Amazon IRL popup store is also the perfect spot for holiday shopping with exclusive sales & promotions all season!  
 
This is the first retail footprint for the incredibly fast growing brand, and what better holiday present than a two-in-one?!
 

Location

Del Amo Fashion Center
Address: 3525 W Carson Street, Torrance, CA 90503  
Pop-Up Dates: November 1st – January 5th
Indian Summer: A Fashion Story

Indian Summer: A Fashion Story

I It’s a hazy shade of late summer— a color, vibrant yet subtle, smooth and alluring, as elegant as a cloud and closing the SoCal summer in style. The cultural relationship to pastels is most often connected with spring because of their association with Easter— pastels have created strong connections with other cultural movements throughout history, too. Pastels were initially known as a chalk-like medium for artists during the Renaissance. In the 17th and 18th centuries, pastel painting became a popular medium with the rise of the Baroque and Rococo styles. During this time, pastels became fashionable in dress because the same frivolity that was the popular taste in art was applied to clothing as well. Marie Antoinette had a proclivity for grand gowns done in pastel silks and laces. In the 20th century, pastels regained popularity during the Roaring Twenties, as flappers turned to the light tones as a response to the seriousness of World War I. Later on, pastels became the calling card of Miami architecture, as art-deco buildings throughout South Beach got a fresh coat of candy-colored paint, reviving the city. Pastels also made an impact on pop culture, with the iconic style of Sonny Crockett on Miami Vice and the art direction of Wes Anderson films, including The Grand Budapest Hotel. That was of course replaced by the chic and eternal, black. But as we all know, fashion comes and goes, so here we are at the backend of Summer looking at the neo-pastels for a summer style extravaganza. Photographed by up-and-coming photographer Christian Acosta, styled by Melissa Tejada, modeled by Danielle Fedder and make-up and hair by Caprice Mitchell. Photographed at the legendary Country Club Studio.

SHOP THE LOOK

RIAN

RIAN

Mini Choker Bag – Clear PVC (Vegan)

Choker Collar (2.5") – Clear PVC

Choker Collar (1.25") – Tan

Choker Cuff (2.5") – Clear PVC

Rita Corset Belt

THE CREW

Christian Acosta – Photographer – @Chrisdnlacosta
Danielle Fedder – Model [email protected]
Melissa Tejada – Stylist [email protected]_
Caprice Mitchell – MUA @primakeupartistry

FIDM 13th Television Costume Design Exhibit

FIDM 13th Television Costume Design Exhibit

The 13th Art of Television Costume Design exhibition is back this summer for another year of celebrating the artistry of costume designers and their teams. Television’s perpetual evolution through both network and digital platforms gives today’s designers even more opportunity to create bold, memorable characters for a variety of programming. This year’s exhibition will feature a diverse assortment of shows across several genres–science fiction fantasies, contemporary comedies, and historical dramas, to name a few–and as always will include Emmy® Award-nominated programs from the 2018-2019 television season. Look for fan favorites such as Game of Thrones, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, and Black-ish, plus discover the latest hits like The Masked Singer and Good Omens,

The exhibition is free to the public and will be held in the FIDM Museum at the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising in downtown Los Angeles through Saturday, Oct. 26. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday.

For information, visit FIDMmuseum.org.

Meet The Majority: How Style Sounds

Meet The Majority: How Style Sounds

Contributing Editor: Anthony Stafford

Lights, cameras, action… Food, music, fashion! These are the staples that make up almost all of Southern California’s events, and it would be a disservice to attendees if even one of those necessities were forgotten. It’s a perfect formula, and emerging denim brand, Majority Denim, is looking to take advantage of what much of SoCal’s population thrives on — while also directly connecting to striving artists and influencers for amazing opportunities.

On Thursday, July 25, 2019, from 7 pm to 10 pm, Majority Denim will hold their first major event, titled “Meet the Majority – How Style Sounds”. This free special event is a celebration of a new beginning in Los Angeles for Majority Denim. This innovative, high-quality fashion brand, is designed to style all genders, and proceeds from every item purchased from the brand will be donated to charity. While designated to be an evening where fashion meets music, Majority Denim plans on introducing their new influencer program, “Meet The Majority”. The Majority influencers will unveil their creative craft by showcasing their custom denim pieces in collaboration with Majority Denim’s Creative Director/Co-Founder, Christian K.

Even more exciting, the event will feature live music performances from Jeff Bernat (@jeffbernat) & Nathi (@nathiofficial) with their original music. Fortunately, the fun doesn’t stop there, as the evening will also include a Majority Denim pop up shop with a DIY Custom Station, complimentary bites and drinks, a live DJ (DJ Street Fox) & live music, a performance by The Mob Dance Company (@themobdanceco), and a night of mingling with the trendsetters and tastemakers of LA. This special event will be held at As We Dwell, located in the Arts District of Los Angeles, at 440 S. Alameda St. More information about this new and beautiful location can be found on their website, while more details about the event can be found on Eventbrite.

Features and benefits of the “Meet The Majority – How Style Sounds” event include:

  • An estimated 1K+ attendees throughout the event.
  • An expansive network of fashionable artists, musicians, actors, dancers, and business entrepreneurs.
  • An innovative denim company fresh to the fashion scene introducing high quality styles fit for all genders.
  • A showcase of the “Meet The Majority” Brand Influencers custom denim styles created with the Creative Director/Co-Founder Christian K. The influencers collective network spans over half a million followers across digital media platforms.

Guests can RSVP for this free event here.

More About Majority Denim

“Sharing a sense of style through community, innovation, and unity. We don’t need to fit in, we stand out” – Majority Denim

“An innovative, high quality fashion brand, designed to style all genders. Made in Los Angeles. A team of veteran denim makers with over 30 years of experience using high quality Italian, Japanese, Brazilian and American denim. We are on the path of discovering the ‘nu’ generation movement and merging it with consistent high quality and tradition.”

Majority Denim also has a recently launched YouTube Channel where they give exclusive access to their business, their partners, lifestyle, and design process. Click the play button below for a deeper glimpse into what the fresh LA. brand is about.

The Office of Angela Scott Partners with GO Campaign to Pay It Forward

The Office of Angela Scott Partners with GO Campaign to Pay It Forward

Teachers are arguably the most undervalued superheroes in today’s workforce — and The Office of Angela Scott knows that all too well having had many teachers throughout her life becoming psuedo-family as she developed her creative muscle to become the designer — and woman — she is today.

 
In honor of Teacher Appreciation Day on May 7th, the female-founded footwear brand is paying it forward by giving 40% of all web sales on May 7th to the GO Campaign to support the Redeemer Community Partnership (RCP). The Office of Angela Scott launched the Pay It Forward program in August of 2018 to honor our incredible teachers with an investment piece that gives them confidence, comfort and a strong foundation to stand tall. The Pay It Forward Program offers teachers a continuous 40% discount applicable to any collection.

The Office of Angela Scott is proud to announce its partnership with GO Campaign for Teacher Appreciation Day 2019 (May 7). GO Campaign, a non-profit organization based in Los Angeles, identifies deserving pioneering Local Heroes throughout the world and partners with their organizations to give opportunity to vulnerable children around the world. Since 2006, GO Campaign has improved the lives of over 133,000 children throughout 35 countries.  In honor of Teacher Appreciation Day, The Office of Angelea Scott is partnering with GO Campaign to support Redeemer Community Partnership (RCP). RCP is an organization focused on nurturing some of Los Angeles’ most vulnerable youth and providing them with the critical academic support they need to ensure that every child growing up in Los Angeles’ most impoverished neighborhoods has the access to education they deserve.

Founded by Richard Parks in 2001, RCP was created to build a safe, healthy, opportunity-rich community where children, youth and families living in Los Angeles’ University Park neighborhood can thrive.  This neighborhood is densely populated, low income, and home to many immigrant families. The median household income is $30,205, much less than the City’s median of $54,501. The schools in RCP’s community struggle to meet the needs of their students. At most schools in the area, the concentration of low-income children is above 90%, and often 30-50% are English Language Learners (ELL).  With large class sizes, high teacher turnover and limited support staff, many students never get the help they need.

At Mack Elementary, just four blocks east of the RCP facility, only 3% of last year’s fifth-graders achieved proficient scores on the state standardized math test. Children entering middle school with math and reading deficits face overwhelming obstacles to college-readiness. . . but RCP is changing all this!  RCP offers an individualized reading curriculum to students during the academic year – giving children the access to the academic support they need to provide them opportunities they never imagined possible. RCP aims for all fifth graders who graduate from their program to have reading skills at or above state grade-level standards. And not only that, but children who are a part of their program are learning to enjoy reading, to feel confident about their ability to learn challenging material, and to use technology without intimidation.  RCP is giving these children the confidence they need to face the world with hope and pride. RCP’s results are a gift to teachers, making their students more engaged and eager to learn.

GO Campaign & The Office of Angela Scott believe in the work RCP is doing and that is why in honor of Teacher Appreciation Day, The Office of Angela Scott is committed to raise funds to provide RCP with three teachers for the fall semester.  These additional staff members will enable RCP to reach its goal of making sure that every fifth grader who graduates from their program not only has reading skills at or above state grade-level standards, but the confidence they need to go on to thrive in middle school.

Christian Cowan Wows L.A. with Powerpuff Girls Inspired Collection

Christian Cowan Wows L.A. with Powerpuff Girls Inspired Collection

     

If there’s something to be said about Christian Cowan, it’s that he’s as innovative as he is fun. We’re talking about a designer who’s dressed the likes of Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, Naomi Campbell, Cardi B, Ariana Grande, and so many more, marking him as a prominent creative in the fashion industry. Amidst his well-deserved success, Cowan chose to celebrate women on International Women’s Day with a thoroughly captivating runway experience in Downtown L.A. at the City Market Social House showcasing his “Powerpuff Girls” inspired capsule collection.

The partnership came directly from Cartoon Network, the very network that first aired “The Powerpuff Girls” in 1998. In a continued celebration of the show’s 20th anniversary, Cartoon Network saw it fit to align itself with Christian Cowan to develop a collection that not only celebrates a pop culture phenomenon like “The Powerpuff Girls,” but also furthers the notion that women and girls can be powerful at any age.

The Powerpuff Girls have always been part of a broader pop cultural celebration around ‘girl power,’ said Jill King SVP, Marketing and Partnerships, Cartoon Network and Boomerang.Christian’s take on the many complex aspects of femininity, along with his originality and fearlessness as a creator, makes this a perfect collaboration to bring the message of empowering girls and women of all ages to life.

The collaboration between Cowan and The Powerpuff Girls will also benefit and support She’s the First (STF), as a means to further promote the nonprofit’s mission to fight gender inequality through education. STF believes that a girl with an education is unstoppable!

I am thrilled to be partnering with such an iconic brand whose message is about supporting one another and kicking butt no matter your age, size or gender,” says Cowan. “I grew up watching The Powerpuff Girls, and I am so lucky to have the opportunity to create a collection inspired by characters that advocate for sisterhood and positivity.

   

SoCal Mag was all for the nostalgia and appreciated Cowan’s attention to detail through design from the show’s inspiration. Hues of the iconic blue, green, and pink donned by the Powerpuff Girls’ uniform were seen throughout the collection with additional nods to other notable characters from the show like Miss Sara Bellum and the Girls’ arch nemesis, Mojo Jojo.

Celebrities in attendance included: Paris Hilton, Heidi Klum, Erika Jayne, Tinashe, Amanda Steele, Kollin Carter, Carly Rae Jepsen, Monique Coleman, Betty Who, Skai Jackson, Kim Petras, Draya Michelle, Shaun Ross, Julissa Bermudez, Francia Raisa, EJ King, Gia Gunn, Max Emerson, Marta Pozzan, Megan Pormer, Patrick Starrr, Christa Allen, Madison Grace, Niia Bertino, Ginta Bertino, Nikita Dragun, Jazzmyne Roberts, Khrystyana Kazakova, and Lindsay Webster.

CREDITS:

Styling – Patti Wilson; Hair – Bumble & Bumble; Makeup – MAC; Music – Ty Sutherland; Production – IMG Focus

Check the rest of the looks at the gallery below:

(Photo Credit: Mark Hill Photography)

google.com, pub-2907176749232271, DIRECT, f08c47fec0942fa0